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    #26
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    all posts made by the Bluelight username "Roger&Me" are works of fiction and are for entertainment purposes only.
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    Also, Unlubricated by Arthur Nersesian.
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    #27
    Bluelighter ice-9's Avatar
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    Cool
    yes, vonnegut is good too..

    i like Cat's Cradle.

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    #28
    wind up bird chronicles-haruki murakami
    geek love-katherine dunn
    infinite jest-david foster wallace
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    #29
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    Originally posted by ice-9
    yes, vonnegut is good too..

    i like Cat's Cradle.
    As your bluelight name gives away to those of us who are Vonnegut fans . . . love his work.
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    #30
    Originally posted by MilesTeg
    To the lineup I'd like to add any book by Neil Gaiman.
    I'll second that. "Neverwhere" is one of my all-time favourite books.
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    #31
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    yep - as if it's needed i totally second:

    geek love by katherine dunn
    perfume by patrick suskind
    neverwhere by neil gaiman

    all three are excellent reads.

    alasdair
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    #32
    Robert Rankin is hilarious, childish and very weird. Like Douglas Adams on...something.

    I've read so many of the books in this thread. Gotta love Bluelight.
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    #33
    Bluelight Crew rm-rf's Avatar
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    Aldous Huxley - Island
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    #34
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    The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster is very cool. and quite weird. Sort of metaphysical detective stories. Highly recommended.

    Dan
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    #35
    Tao Te Ching - Lao Tzu
    America - John Stuart
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    #36
    Harmony Korine's book A Crackup at the Race Riots is pretty "weird", I traded it for another book awhile ago however and vaguely regret it..

    Pierre Guyotat's Eden Eden Eden is vile and interesting, if your french is good I'd read the original instead of the english trans. that I did.

    I like this thread.
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    #37
    Bluelighter nephron's Avatar
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    Tim Powers (author)- kind of adventure/fantasy/horror. Putting a different twist on historical events.

    Jostein Gaarder- Sophie's world- philosophical summary in novel form.

    China Mieville- Perdido St Station, then The Scar and The Iron Council. Beautiful lefty fantasy steampunk novels.
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    #38
    Bluelighter nephron's Avatar
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    Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman is beautiful- if you're in the mood for some easier/lighter reading may I suggest just about anything by Diana Wynne Jones- young adult fiction author, but fantastic quality. Also Coraline by Neil Gaiman. Actually, anything by Neil Gaiman. His Sandman comics series was fantastic.

    Promethea (comic) by Alan Moore.
    From Hell- the comic the movie was based on- much better and darker, though oft banned. Also by Alan Moore, and illustrated by Eddie Campbell.
    Anything by Alan Moore.
    Anything by Dave Sims if you can get over his misogyny.
    Any comic authored by Grant Morrison.
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    #39
    Just wanted to update this thread a bit. I know it's a bit old but wanted to thank everyone who contributed. I've read some of the books suggested and have more on the way. blahblahblah- I ended up reading Beam me up, Scotty and it was a good read, thanks.
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    #40
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    Originally posted by fizzacyst
    "Snow Crash" by Neal Stephenson is kind of wierd... I really like it. If you like sci-fi/post apocalyptical/"cyberpunk" type stuff you might like it. I think a lot of his stuff is kind of like William Gibson's.
    I see how Stephenson's work is extremely similiar to that of Gibson.. except, to me, it's much better. Burning Chrome (Gibson) was extremely boring to me while Snow Crash was the most enjoyable thing I've read all quarter. Gibson set the stage for the cyberpunk writing but Stephenson made it GOOD.
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    #41
    Bluelighter blahblahblah's Avatar
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    Not problem not-a-unique-snowflake, glad you liked it...
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    #42
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    Originally posted by glitterbizkit
    I'll second that. "Neverwhere" is one of my all-time favourite books.
    Cool. I just bought 'neverwhere' -- I look forward to reading it. Right now I'm reading "Against a Dark Background" by Iain Banks. I'll have to check out the "Bridge."

    I'd like to recommend Philip K Dick's The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. It is defintely a weird book. It's like a hit of acid, in handy dandy book format.
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    #43
    Bluelighter smart-e's Avatar
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    Candy: A Novel of Love and Addiction
    By Luke Davies. Published as a paperback original in this country by Ballantine in 1998, this is a doper novel set in Australia in the late 80s-early 90s. I know Davies and this is mostly autobiographical stuff and very well written. Lots of details of ripping and running Aussie style, including cooking up heroin "home bake" from OTC codeine pills. Fascinating. Very Very GOOD

    This is an awesome book.
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    #44
    Bluelight Crew dr seuss's Avatar
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    Originally posted by goatofthenever
    Perfume by PATRICK SUSKIND
    thirded! superb. his other work, 'the pigeon', is definitely weird but a completely different undertaking - stark minimalist existentialism, really.

    i thoroughly recommend:

    albert camus - almost anything, particularly 'exile and the kingdom
    milan kundera - almost anything, but especially 'the unbearable lightness of being' and 'immortality'
    william goldman - 'the princess bride' (trust me!)
    jean cocteau - 'opium'
    john wyndham - 'the day of the triffids', 'the midwich cuckoos'
    ben okri - 'the famished road'
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    Books - Authors & Books Discussion 
    #45
    Lightbulb
    This thread is purely for the discussion of books, authors and related topics.

    I recently merged the "Good Weird Books" thread here...

    Many thanks to all those who regularly contribute
    Last edited by colicolo; 18-07-2008 at 00:21.
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    #46
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    I'm up to my eyeballs in HTML coding and bio-diesel shit.

    But, I'll discuss my other two intellectual mentors: Henry David Thoreau, and Abbie Hoffman.

    Once upon a time, I was a Junior HS geek. Yeah, smart, but that never got anyone a date. I was taking one of of those 'fill in the right oval with a #2 pencil' tests, and, as usual. I finished it before everyone else. I'm bored...I'm looking around...there's this book somebody left there.

    "Walden; or, Life in the Woods"

    I stole it.

    I read this book, and, RESONANCE. Here's a fucking socially rejected geek, like me, from the 19th century. So many things I felt, thought...echoed.

    Now, I'm not alone. I'm part of an American tradition...those who Will Not Go Along To Get Along. It gave me hope, and strength. I did not kill myself.

    Then, a few years later, I pick up this book called "Steal This Book." I still haven't gotten laid, I'm still a fucking geek, but I get from this: you don't have to be like the others. Life is not like the fucking Boy Scouts, where your lot in life is determined by what social Merit Badges you've earned. Life is FREE form. it's what you can TAKE; it's what you make of it. FUCK the powers that be...

    Sorry. I've gotten into the Budweiser again. But, in a very real sense, these writers were my salvation.
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    #47
    I always love a read that tauts if not celebrates the underdog or the underground. To often we are forced into a homogeny that we did not ask but our parents generation invited with open arms to cure the woes that westernization may or may not have caused. I love reading things about sociatal hacking, memetic engneering. Basically future speak in modern terms. I will have to check out the books that you spoke about.

    Currently i am readig some orson scott card light reading. But i just finished a great book about queer gnosism. It was called jesus and the tradition of same sex love. I liked it for its subversive take or alternative history of a religion that is all pervasive here in america.
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    #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by liquidphil1
    Currently i am readig some orson scott card light reading. But i just finished a great book about queer gnosism. It was called jesus and the tradition of same sex love. I liked it for its subversive take or alternative history of a religion that is all pervasive here in america.
    I read a story by him once in Omni magazine, called "A Thousand Deaths."

    Interestingly, Card is a practicing, and tithing, Mormon.
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    #49
    I'm reading "The Razor's Edge" by W. Somerset Maugham. It's really uneventful as far as action or plot goes, but Maugham is a genius in the way he describes the details and progression of his characters. That alone is just as enthralling as physical action.

    It's about the author's observations after WWI, during the depression, and I believe during WWII of a group of people he comes to call his friends. The real protagonist is a kid who comes back from WWI and, after seeing his best friend die, chooses the path of knowledge and "loafing" over business and financial success. He turns out to live a much more fulfilling life than his money-oriented counterparts. The characters are from Europe and the States.

    So far it's good.

    fasteddie... I've always been interested in reading that book but I've never been sure if it would interest me to finish the entire thing. Is it very intriguing?
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    #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by wastedwalrus
    fasteddie... I've always been interested in reading that book but I've never been sure if it would interest me to finish the entire thing. Is it very intriguing?
    I assume you mean "Walden."

    It was one of the first "great books" I ever read. It's on the long side...I've heard it described as dull.

    Try portions of it...the first chapter, "Economy" is pretty easy going. He makes a list of how much he paid for everything...there's a note next to one of the items saying "That was high."

    Old Yankee skinflint.

    He would have been horrified at the hippie subculture...he was a very abstaining person...didn't even use coffee or tea. And, he may very well never have had sex. There's a theory he was gay.

    There's the fungus called Phallus Impudicus that is a dead ringer appearance wise for a human dick. He found one of these things, got really outraged...at whom, I'm not sure. He also made a drawing of it in his journal that was so detailed that the early publishers (he was not "discovered" until the 1920'S) had to suppress it!
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