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    #51
    Cool, thanks for the details. Hopefully I can work that in this summer (I have a stack of books I want to get through).
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    #52
    Quote Originally Posted by fasteddie
    I read a story by him once in Omni magazine, called "A Thousand Deaths."

    Interestingly, Card is a practicing, and tithing, Mormon.
    I know. Check out his endor series. It was beautifully written. The first book deals with the idea philosophically of what alien life can be ramon veralese, good or bad yadda yadda. The second book is titled speaker for the dead, which is the real meat of the series in which he inserts ideologies about where souls come from and the interconnectivity or all creatures both man made and alien alike. brilliant.
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    #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by wastedwalrus
    Cool, thanks for the details. Hopefully I can work that in this summer (I have a stack of books I want to get through).

    "Steal This Book" is worthwhile, too.

    I still remember this picture in it...a shirtless Hoffman, outside the movie theater, with the caption: FUCK! I forgot my shirt!
    Last edited by fasteddie; 04-06-2007 at 10:03.
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    #54
    Bluelight Crew katmeow's Avatar
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    I'm reading Ben Elton - Inconceivable at the moment. Needed something light before tackling a book on climate change that's sitting on the shelf.

    I've liked all the books of his that I've read, but I'm finding it very hard to relate in any way to the main female character in this book and her overwhelming desire to have children.
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    #55
    I once read a book, but I can not remember the tittle.

    It was a short Australian novel told in first person about a boy who is blind, although it never clearly states that he is blind. It was a great book, has anyone else ever heard of it. The biy gets shot and his dog dies as well....

    Col
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    #56
    Bluelighter Mind-Melt's Avatar
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    i want to read the new chuck palahniuk book. he is awesome. he is legend.
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    #57
    Alright so yesterday I stormed the poetry section of Barnes & Noble. I've been having an awful time with writer's block and I thought reading some more of the poets who have always inspired me would help. Frantically, I tore up the shelves. I bought "The Book of Images" by Rainer Maria Rilke, a compilation of poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (if you haven't read "Crossing The Bar", you don't know what real poetry is), "A Poet To His Beloved" by W.B. Yeats, "The Love Poems of John Keats, and a compilation of poems by William Wordsworth (again... if you've never read "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge", you've been had). I have my reading set out for me... I'm also about to start "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" by Stephen King.
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    #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by wastedwalrus
    "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge", you've been had).

    "and all that mighty heart is lying still!"

    No shit, amigo.


    I was once chatting with somebody about Emily Dickinson on line, and I commented that she "compressed meaning" better than any other writer.

    This fellow took it as a "lit crit" cliche...perhaps it is. But, I'm a fucking CHEMIST, I don't know SHIT about what I'm supposed to say. But, I do know what's GOOD.

    "Exhaltation is the going,
    of an inland soul to sea,
    Past the houses, past the headlands,
    into deep Eternity.

    Bred as we, among the mountains,
    Can the sailor understand,
    The Divine Intoxication
    Of the first league out from land?"

    Rock 'n roll, plus sales tax, miss Em.


    Ample make THIS BED!

    Make this BED WITH AWE!

    In it wait till Judgement break, EXCELLENT AND FAIR!

    Be its mattress straight

    Its pillow round,

    Let no sunrises yellow noise,

    Interrupt this ground.

    (Exclamation points and capitalization added)

    Rest well, all our well loved shades, those who've gone...where we're all headed.
    Last edited by fasteddie; 10-06-2007 at 00:28.
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    #59
    Well played, sir. Well played
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    #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by colicolo
    I once read a book, but I can not remember the tittle.

    It was a short Australian novel told in first person about a boy who is blind, although it never clearly states that he is blind. It was a great book, has anyone else ever heard of it. The biy gets shot and his dog dies as well....

    Col
    I don't have the book anymore (The Fatal Shore, by R. Hughes) but he talks about an Aussie writer, kind of like our Bret Harte, whose stories revolve around the theme of "mateship."

    What's that guy's name, somebody?
    Last edited by fasteddie; 10-06-2007 at 02:18.
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    #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by wastedwalrus
    Well played, sir. Well played
    Thanks, buddy.

    While we're on the subject of Tennyson, do you know "Ulysses"?

    Great piece for old farts like me.

    "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield."
    Last edited by fasteddie; 10-06-2007 at 02:20.
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    More Huxley 
    #62
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    He wrote a book called "Ape and Essence."

    In it is depicted a scene symbolic of WW III. There's two opposed armies of baboons...one in red uniforms, one in blue. Each one has a mascot Einstein on a leash.

    One Einstein calls out to the other: Is that you, Albert?

    The other Einstein replies: Yes, Albert, I'm afraid it is.
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    #63
    Quote Originally Posted by fasteddie
    Thanks, buddy.

    While we're on the subject of Tennyson, do you know "Ulysses"?

    Great piece for old farts like me.

    "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield."

    Of course... and I assume you're familiar with "The Lady of Shalott"? Great piece for young, hopeless romantics such as myself .
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    #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by wastedwalrus
    Of course... and I assume you're familiar with "The Lady of Shalott"? Great piece for young, hopeless romantics such as myself .
    I do not know it.

    Lessee...poets...

    Another of my favorites: Spoon River Anthology, Edgar Lee Masters.
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    #65
    I haven't read that one either but I will before I get offline.

    Let me recommend anything from Rainer Maria Rilke's "Book of Images". It's one of the greatest works of poetry of all time.

    I would recommend... to start with... I suppose "Progress". Simply because his metaphors and imagery are so outlandish and unique.
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    #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by wastedwalrus
    I haven't read that one either but I will before I get offline.
    lol... how long did you stay online?

    I read the Spoon River Anthology recently on the recommendation of my mentor. It's certainly not well known outside North America, but I understand it's standard issue in the States - on school reading lists, etc?

    Rilke is wonderful. I love the Duino Elegies, especially the eighth.

    And I've read The Lady of Shalott... my first girlfriend was obsessed with that poem.

    At the moment I'm re-reading an anthology called Conductors of Chaos, which covers experimental UK poetry, mainly from the the latter half of the 20th century, up to the 90s. There's a fair bit of impenetrable, linguistically challenging stuff, but it has a fantastic selection of Jeremy Reed poems.
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    #67
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    Rilke (sp?) I do not know at all. That's a deficiency I'll be correcting shortly.

    As for Masters, he was a working Chicago lawyer during a very turbulent part of American History. That is one of the things that makes that book so interesting.

    He had some other works, but they did not catch my interest.
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    #68
    Quote Originally Posted by (Wordy)
    lol... how long did you stay online?

    I read the Spoon River Anthology recently on the recommendation of my mentor. It's certainly not well known outside North America, but I understand it's standard issue in the States - on school reading lists, etc?

    Rilke is wonderful. I love the Duino Elegies, especially the eighth.

    And I've read The Lady of Shalott... my first girlfriend was obsessed with that poem.

    At the moment I'm re-reading an anthology called Conductors of Chaos, which covers experimental UK poetry, mainly from the the latter half of the 20th century, up to the 90s. There's a fair bit of impenetrable, linguistically challenging stuff, but it has a fantastic selection of Jeremy Reed poems.

    Haha I had no idea what I was promising to when I said that... so nevermind
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    #69
    Quote Originally Posted by fasteddie
    Thanks, buddy.

    While we're on the subject of Tennyson, do you know "Ulysses"?

    Great piece for old farts like me.

    "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield."
    great piece..
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    #70
    i'm currently finishing up reading a biography of edith piaf.. amazing.. then its onto peter ackroyd's london .. which has being collecting dust for a while.

    I think a book club on here would be a cool idea!
    x
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    Don DeLillo - "White Noise" 
    #71
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    Anyone know it? When I get a few sheckels to spend on a book, this is the one.
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    #72
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    ^ Great novel. Highly recommended.
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    #73
    eeek just finished london.. was amazing!
    onto darkmans by nicola barker.. its a new one.. has anyone read it?x
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    Primo Levi - The Periodic Table 
    #74
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    Anybody know it?

    I frequently think of the chapter in it - "Vanadium."

    (All the chapters in it are named after chemical elements)

    Levi wound up, some twenty years after he got out of Auschwitz, having business dealings with the guy who had been his supervisor in the lab he worked in there, in Farben's slave labor factory. The guy was a civilian...over the years, he had made up to himself, apparently, this collection of stories about how good he'd been to Levi and the other guy who worked there. Levi started corresponding with him, and, he didn't remember any of that. Because, none of it ever happened. They're going back and forth by letter...they were going to meet...then Levi gets a letter from the guy's wife that he'd died suddenly.

    My interpretation...this fellow, in order to live with himself as a collaborator with the great death machine, had made up these stories...told them and retold them until he believed them himself. Then, Levi comes along, and the clash between made up reality, and real reality, set up a conflict in the guy that killed him.

    Like Reverend Dimmesdale, dying with a scarlet 'A' stigmata on his breast.
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    #75
    I would like to recommend to everyone here any book by tom robbins, However, a good one to start is "fierce invalids home from hot climates." Tom robbins is always loaded with sex drugs and philosophy, my 3 favorite things.
    I will check out the "steal this book."
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