Bluelight

Synthetic Cannabinoids Study

Thread: 'Ice Wars'- ABC production

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. Collapse Details
    'Ice Wars'- ABC production 
    #1
    Bluelighter smokedup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    The last chance to evacuate planet earth, before its recycled.
    Posts
    408
    http://www.tvtonight.com.au/2017/01/...-ice-wars.html

    So, a 4-part series begins soon, relating to methamphetamine use in Australia. I sense this may become bleak and upsetting to watch.

    I hope it delves more in to peoples personal battles with meth, the reasons stemming from their use etc, rather than just the polices context on the matter.

    The ice age by catalyst? i consider the gold standard of documentary film-making on the matter. Hopefully they draw from the techniques used in the original.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
     
    #2
    Bluelighter
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    2615
    Posts
    2,706
    I remember the day that came out. That gave lots of Australians their first glimpse of ice. I was young so it was quite scary.

    I remember Matty and his "Speed skater" mates. His "Figure skater" missus going through the bins all tweaked out. I imagine he wasn't very popular with his suppliers after his tell all expose.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
     
    #3
    Senior Moderator
    Australian Drug Discussion
    Non-Electronic Music Discussion
    spacejunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    up the creek
    Posts
    13,451
    Ice Age was quite an eye-opener for me - even though i was probably using meth at the time and not unfamiliar with its depravity..:
    It's a great documentary.

    Hopefully this will be insightful, rather than the usual nonsense we see in the Australian press about methamphetamine.
    While i have always had a far higher degree of faith in the ABC than in commercial networks, there have been some unsettling changes at the ABC recently, which i hope will not affect the quality of their programming.

    From the little blurb you linked to, smokedup, it sort of looks a bit like anti-drug propaganda...but i hope it is presented in a way that isn't too sensationalist, as a lot of meth reports tend to be.

    Thanks - i'd not heard about this, and i look forward to checking it out.
    ✺✹✺✹BLUA✺✹✺✹
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
     
    #4
    Bluelighter
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    10 hours into the future
    Posts
    227
    I missed Ice Age the first time around but I'm definitely queuing it up for the next night I can't sleep

    ABC is definitely less impartial and agenda-free than it used to be so it remains to be seen if there's any subtle anvil-dropping in this new one
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
     
    #5
    Bluelighter
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    2615
    Posts
    2,706
    I thought you guys were talking about the original doco that came out in the early nineties.
    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
     
    #6
    Senior Moderator
    Australian Drug Discussion
    Non-Electronic Music Discussion
    spacejunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    up the creek
    Posts
    13,451
    the documentary Ice Age came out in the early-mid 2000s i believe
    Last edited by spacejunk; 01-02-2017 at 23:00.
    ✺✹✺✹BLUA✺✹✺✹
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
     
    #7
    Ice Age was a fascinating documentary. It came out in 2006.

    A real up close look at the lives of ice users in Sydney's inner city and inner west. Real quality stuff. Should be shown to every kid who wants to try ice.
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
     
    #8
    Bluelighter
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    2615
    Posts
    2,706
    Quote Originally Posted by spacejunk View Post
    the documentary Ice Age came out in the early-mid 2000s i believe
    That's the one I meant. I could have sworn that came out a lot earlier.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
     
    #9
    Bluelighter hyroller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, OZ
    Posts
    3,546
    Since the ice caps are no longer melting, this should be an eye-opener.
    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
     
    #10
    Bluelighter
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    310
    Another interesting Doco worth watching is the National geographic Drugs INC. episode Aussie ice wars. Typical of the Drugs INC. series it gave a pretty balance view of the drug supply chain as well as the law enforcement response. The episode mainly focused on Sydney which is to be expected but it also showed the QLD anti-bikie task force.

    Like the ABC Four corners Ice age episode the self-confessed ice user/addict featured in Drugs INC was towards the more hard-core reckless level of drug use. It showed the ice addict getting the VIP treatment from his dealer who gave him a IV shot containing 2 points of ice. Not exactly moderate drug use LOL.

    I guess showing Joe average who holds down a job smoking a point or two of ice and sleeping it off a day and half later wouldn't be as interesting.
    Reply With Quote
     

  11. Collapse Details
     
    #11
    I guess showing Joe average who holds down a job smoking a point or two of ice and sleeping it off a day and half later wouldn't be as interesting
    Exactly that. I also "enjoyed" the Ice Age episode, but I believe the narrator actually said "Matty goes harder than most". Yeah, they found a dude that many normal mainstream folk would call a junkie. Doesn't he literally get his Centrelink payment and slam it up his arm immediately till it's all gone?

    I'm not judging the guy in the doco but I think as interesting as it was it paints a picture which is not representative of the majority of meth users - or other "hard" drug users for that matter. We're in an age where lots of "regular" people are using drugs in order to maintain a life they otherwise can't sustain.

    I'd be more interested to see a doco which shows the mundane reality of middle class working people getting hooked on heroin or meth or whatever because they couldn't make it through the week otherwise. Perhaps we as a society are not ready to admit that this is how it is. It's still so taboo to take drugs which are not socially acceptable.

    <I am listening the Beach Boys - great music>
    Reply With Quote
     

  12. Collapse Details
     
    #12
    Nobody wants to watch that, it's boring and depressing They'd much prefer the vicarious thrill of watching a down and out junkie (preferably as dirty, dysfunctional and uneducated as possible, just to remind viewers that they're nothing like "one of those people").
    Reply With Quote
     

  13. Collapse Details
     
    #13
    ‘Ice Wars’ message is overblown and unhelpful



    Without doubt, crystal methamphetamine, or ice, is capable of causing immense harm. That’s true for many drugs, including alcohol. But when facts are distorted to create fear and stigma it helps no one. Not the people who use ice. Not their families. Not the health professionals supporting them. Not the police who enforce drug law.

    Ice Wars, airing over the next few weeks on ABC, shows the dark side of crystal methamphetamine use. It shows the great, but difficult work that police, mental health and substance use treatment professionals do every day.

    It carefully explains some of the commonly misunderstood effects of the drug. It shows the breadth of the ice problem across police, treatment services and individuals. And it shows how people are suffering and the compassionate response that is possible from health workers and police.

    There’s no ‘ice epidemic’

    Most of what is reported in this four-part documentary is not incorrect, but it lacks nuance and context. It makes entertaining television, but it contains the type of sensational language that can create community fears leading to the stigmatisation of people who use drugs and knee jerk responses from policy makers.

    We are not “under siege”, or “at war” with ice. There is no ice epidemic. Ice is not “tearing apart the fabric of our community”.

    Crystal methamphetamine, commonly known as “ice”, is one form of methamphetamine. The other main form is a powder, commonly known as “speed”. They are the same chemical, but ice is more pure and therefore much stronger.

    We have seen a consistent decrease over the last 15 years in the percentage of the population using methamphetamine, but a large proportion of the group who previously used speed are now using ice. From our best available data, 2.1% of Australians over 14 years have used methamphetamine in the last year and about half of those prefer ice over speed.

    It’s close to the truth that 1.3 million people have tried crystal methamphetamine – the figure is probably more like 850,000. It sounds like a lot of people, but it’s around 5% of the population over 14 years old.

    The vast majority of these people have tried the drug not more than a handful of times and are not regular users. Around 1% of the Australian population have used ice in the past year. Around three quarters of that 1% have used not more than 12 times in the past year. That means only 0.25% of the population use more than once a month.

    Yes, there is an increased risk of psychosis among people who use methamphetamine, but 75% of people who use it regularly never have any type of psychotic experience. Yes, there is an increased risk of agitation, aggression and violence among people who use methamphetamine, but 75% of people who use it regularly never become aggressive while using it.

    Clearly ice is capable of causing significant harm to the person using it and to others, and significant distress to their families and friends. It’s a drug that when it is bad, it can be very bad.



    But we already know the best, most cost effective way to reduce drug use in the community is to reduce demand through effective treatment. Interventions as brief as two sessions, counselling and longer term rehabilitation are all effective, and people who use methamphetamine do as well, or better, in treatment than people who use other drugs.

    Fear and stigma help no-one

    There is one significant thing we have learned from hundreds of sessions of community education, thousands of hours of worker training and many sessions of treatment with people who use ice and their families: it is counterproductive and distressing for people who are affected when the media makes exaggerated negative claims, showing only the ugly side of drug use.

    One of the greatest harms to people who use drugs is the fear and stigma generated by exaggerated images, out of context “facts”, and name calling - “monsters”, “junkies”, “addicts”, “zombies”. We see it every day - fear drives good people to lock their doors and close their hearts. Families and individuals become isolated as a result, and communities outcast those who need to be pulled closer.

    Our research has found it takes on average five years for someone to access treatment after they first experience problems with methamphetamine. We know the earlier someone gets treatment, the better the outcomes. Continued stigmatisation of people who use ice and their families only serves to prolong the time to treatment by making it less likely those who need help will ask for it.

    Fear and stigma also make it hard for families to have an open discussion about drugs, which is crucial in prevention efforts. Talking early and openly about drugs in an age-appropriate way is one of the best protective factors for kids.

    Fear messages don’t work on young people, and they don’t work on the people at highest risk of using. They just make those who would probably never try the drug more determined not to. Sometimes these approaches can even increase young people’s interest in using. Kids see the world differently from adults. When we use scare tactics on kids, if it doesn’t fall within their sphere of experience they switch off.

    Fear drives poor policy, policy that focuses on “crackdowns”, “zero tolerance” and scare campaigns. None of these things is effective. We know what reduces drug related harms in the community is a focus on support, on keeping people alive and on access to treatment.

    So watch Ice Wars with interest. But question, reflect, look for the good news. Remember it’s not the whole story. And know the people who use methamphetamine and their families are, first and foremost, people. Compassion and a clear head is going to solve this problem. Not fear and stigma.

    Annie Bleeker from the Alcohol and Drug Foundation co-authored this article.

    http://theconversation.com/ice-wars-...nhelpful-72719
    Reply With Quote
     

  14. Collapse Details
     
    #14
    Reply With Quote
     

  15. Collapse Details
     
    #15
    Reply With Quote
     

  16. Collapse Details
     
    #16
    With respect to the first ice age doco, there was a second user they portrayed called Jason, who previously held down a good job that he only recently lost as he spiralled into heavier use. He was a smoker not an injecting user. Although it did mention he used heroin too (didn't mention ROA)

    So I guess they made somewhat of an effort to show a more "everyday" kind of user. the kind of dude you could walk past and probably only a trained eye could spot that he was a drug user.
    Reply With Quote
     

  17. Collapse Details
     
    #17
    Bluelighter
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    2615
    Posts
    2,706
    Are we allowed to post prices on AusDD now?
    Last edited by drug_mentor; 20-02-2017 at 07:52.
    Reply With Quote
     

  18. Collapse Details
     
    #18
    Moderator
    Australian Drug Discussion
    drug_mentor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,327
    Quote Originally Posted by Verybuffed View Post
    Are we allowed to post prices on AusDD now?
    In short, no.

    Any further price discussion will result in disciplinary action against the user(s) responsible.
    Reply With Quote
     

  19. Collapse Details
     
    #19
    Bluelighter consumer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Waiting to mug FUBARs postman
    Posts
    6,742
    I cant see why you dont allow personal use amount prices discussed. They do in EADD and the sky has not fallen in there.
    Reply With Quote
     

  20. Collapse Details
     
    #20
    Moderator
    Australian Drug Discussion
    drug_mentor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,327
    It has never been allowed here, so far as I am aware; and personally, I don't really see the relevance of prices to HR. There are likely to be some changes made to this forum in the near future, and it is a possibility that in the process of making those changes price discussion will be something which is reevaluated. However, in the meantime, the guidelines haven't changed and are being enforced as usual.
    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •