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Thread: Can a drug test tell the difference between Oxycontin and Percocet?

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    Can a drug test tell the difference between Oxycontin and Percocet? 
    #1
    I have a urine test to take in 20 days. I have a script for Percocet 5/325. I dont take them much. I take 1, 20mg OC in the a.m. and 1 20mg OC in the p.m. The drug test is for a pain management clinic, so its ok to test positive for the Percocets. My question is, can they tell that I have been taking Oxycontin instead of the Percocet, just by the urine test results? If so, how long before I have to take the test should I stop taking the Oxy's, and take just the Percocet?
     

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    #2
    Bluelighter Partykid12's Avatar
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    Oxycodone is in both of those drugs, so no, they won't be able to tell the difference.
     

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    Partykid12 
    #3
    Thats kinda what I thought, hope that we are right. I have never had to take a drug test before, so I dont know if they can only tell that yes, I have Oxycodone in my system, or if they can see how much and say wait a minute, you sure are taking an awful lot of the Percocets! I hope that thats not the case. Thanks for your input.
     

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    #4
    Bluelight Crew michael's Avatar
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    yes, they will be able to tell that you have a higher amount of oxycodone in your system then you are supposed to have.

    if you spend .0003 seconds searching, you will probably find out how long opiates stay in your system. i don't remember, and if you are too lazy to look it up yourself, why should i bother?
     

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    #5
    Bluelighter eternalcrux's Avatar
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    Oxycontin and Percs both have the same active ingredient: oxycodone, and drug tests usually don;t even get that specific, it will prob just show up as 'opiate.' You could always claim you toom a bunch of cold medecine to battle a stuffy nose (dxm, an analough of morphine i believe, which of coarse is an opiate.)

    Another thing you could try to pull is the old lame poppy seed excuse.
     

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    #6
    Eternalcrux,
    Thanks for the helpful info. Like I posted earlier, I have never had to take a drug test, so I dont know what the test can or cannot do. It is no problem if I test positive for oxycodone, as long as the test only verifies the drug is present, rather than measuring the amount of drug present. Thats all that concerns me because I just dont know what they test for. If we were talking about pot for example, I find it hard to believe that a urine test would tell them that I had smoked a joint, or an ounce. I would figure that it would only tell them that I had smoked pot. I bet that a blood test on the other hand would be more specific, but I'm not taking a blood test, so who cares. Thanks again for your info.
     

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    #7
    Bluelighter eternalcrux's Avatar
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    .... yes, selektah
     

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    ?what? 
    #8
    Originally posted by eternalcrux
    .... yes, selektah
    Sorry I dont quite understand, would you care to interpret? Thanks

    I think I have found the answers to my own questions. I was reading on myWebMD Health, and found this:

    Results

    Most toxicology screening tests determine only the presence of drugs (called qualitative testing) in the body and not the specific level or quantity. Follow-up testing is often required to determine the exact level of a certain drug in the body (called quantitative testing) and to confirm the results of initial testing.

    Toxicology screening Normal:
    Qualitative testing detects no unexpected drugs in urine or blood. Quantitative testing indicates levels of prescription or nonprescription medications within the effective (therapeutic) range.

    Abnormal:
    Qualitative testing detects drugs in urine or blood.

    Quantitative testing indicates that the level of prescribed medications is too low or too high to be effective (therapeutic).


    Greater-than-normal values may mean

    In quantitative toxicology testing, higher-than-effective (therapeutic) levels of prescription or nonprescription medications may indicate a drug overdose (whether accidental or intentional).

    Lower-than-normal values may mean

    Quantitative toxicology testing that indicates lower-than-therapeutic levels of a prescription medication may mean that a person is not complying with the medication regimen or that an effective dose has not been prescribed.
    Last edited by lgriffincsa; 23-05-2003 at 16:41.
     

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    Re: ?what? 
    #9
    Bluelighter eternalcrux's Avatar
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    Originally posted by lgriffincsa
    Sorry I dont quite understand, would you care to interpret?
    Thanks but no. It was a drug-induced statement and i forgot what I meant by it. Fucking alprazolam..
     

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