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Thread: Treating cigarette addiction with psychedelics

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    #26
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    I cant describe it in any way other than feeling like a switch flipped inside me. Suddenly, I realized how ridiculous smoking was, why was I doing something that made me feel miserable? Psychedelics helped me zoom out and break through my own frozen ideas about not being able to quit. The only thought I had was: I dont want to do this anymore.

    -Thijs Roes

    -----

    I was just really unhappy. I was smoking a pack of cigarettes a day, and I was unhealthy. After working for three years after law school, I quit my job and looked for the next step. That's
    when a friend convinced me to try LSD. Before my experience, there was this struggle every day between my will to quit and my desire for a cigarette. But afterward, there was no struggle.
    I just no longer desired cigarettes.

    -Daniel Miller

    -----

    I had been smoking for 15 years, and while tripping on LSD I had gone outside to smoke. It was during that smoke when I fully came to terms with the addiction, felt the shame of doing something so terrible to my body, and decided it was time to let go. A few days later I had my last cigarette. Here and there over the last year and a half I've succumbed to the temptation. Each time I couldn't finish it, I couldn't stand the taste or smell. It was repulsive. Moral of the story is that I believe LSD can assist oneself in curing addiction with time, effort, and supporting friends.

    -iFUBAR
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    #27
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    Can psilocybin help smokers quit?


    Nicotine patches, chewing gum, cold turkey. Giving up cigarettes can be tough, but there are many strategies smokers can try. Matthew Johnson wants to add another: he says he can
    help smokers quit by giving them another drug, psilocybin, that has been illegal for years in much of Europe and North America. And yes, he realises that sounds unconventional.

    The idea that this research sounds counterintuitive, it makes sense to me, he tells me as we sit in his office at Johns Hopkins Behavioural Pharmacology Research Unit in Baltimore.

    Johnson is a behavioural pharmacologist who has been researching the relationship between drugs, the brain, and human behaviour for more than 20 years. The last 10 of those have been spent here at Johns Hopkins, where he and his team have focused on psilocybin, a naturally occurring psychedelic and the active ingredient in magic mushrooms. Illegal it might be, but if psilocybin is given to smokers a few times in a carefully controlled way, it can be a remarkably effective aid to help them kick the habit, he says.

    Most people will naturally assume that we're looking at substitution therapy in the spirit of methadone for heroin addiction or nicotine patch or nicotine gum to replace smoking. [But] we're not talking about putting someone on psilocybin or mushrooms every day. It's not trading one addiction for the other.

    This new research has been inspired by work done in the 1950s and 60s that looked at using psilocybin and LSD as treatments for addiction. Although results back then were hugely promising, the research hit a dead end as use of these substances spread from labs and into the emerging drug counter-culture. The drugs were criminalised, and clinical research became impossible to conduct.

    It's been off limits for all the wrong reasons, Johnson explains. We know [these substances] continue to be used, and because of not wanting to encourage uncontrolled recreational use, we've been so restrictive that we haven't allowed research. We're really playing a catch-up game. This stuff should've been done in the mid 70s, the whole research agenda was just put in deep freeze for multiple decades.

    In 2008 Johnson co-authored a paper entitled Human hallucinogen research: guidelines for safety, which outlined how to conduct medical trials with psilocybin. The paper signaled a change in attitude towards researching these compounds, reflected by the fact that more than 460 psilocybin sessions have now been conducted at Johns Hopkins alone, ranging from investigating its use by cancer patients through to its effects on meditation. But its the Smoking Cessation programme, which has just finished its pilot stage, that has attracted the most recent attention.

    The program seems deceptively simple at first. Fifteen volunteers, all long time smokers from the Baltimore area who have tried and failed to quit smoking multiple times, start with a course of cognitive behavioural therapy. CBT is the standard psychological approach to quitting smoking, encouraging subjects to reflect on their established thinking patterns.

    A vital part of the Hopkins programmes CBT approach is the writing and reciting of a personal mantra; a simple phrase that each volunteer creates that encapsulates why they want to quit. This is really our mission statement. If you had one sentence that you could remind yourself down the road why you quit. Weve had some people for whom its about family: I want to be there for my granddaughter. For other people, it's more philosophical, The air that I breathe. I want it to be free.

    This mantra becomes even more central on the day they take their first psilocybin. After four sessions of CBT, the volunteers smoke what is meant to be their last cigarette. For some this is the night before, for others its literally just before the session. We've had people smoke in the parking lot right before they come in here, Johnson tells me.

    Then, its time for the drug. Albert Garcia-Romeu, a post-doctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins, who guides the volunteers through the CBT and the psilocybin sessions, describes how it works:
    We have them take the capsule and give them some slippers. We want them to relax into the day and feel almost like they're in a spa.

    We practice before. Give them our hand so that they have the support if they need it, explains Mary Cosimano, another of the guides who has been working in the field for more than 15 years. We tell them, We're here for you as much as you like.

    Once the drug effect starts to kick in, we encourage them just to lie down, continues Garcia-Romeu. They put on headphones. They cover their eyes. We have them just lay back and watch and wait.

    From this point, the researchers step back. What we do here is psychedelic therapy, explains Garcia-Romeu. That's high-dose, generally not a talking therapy. We encourage them
    to go inward. Thats really where a lot of the important work happens. I'm mostly just there as a safety-monitor.


    The aim is to give the volunteers aprofound experience that causes them to reassess their relationship with smoking. That might sound New Age, but Garcia-Romeu explains it to me in a way that sounds much more grounded.

    Research shows theres a 71% success rate for people who quit smoking just after they had a heart attack, he explains. A heart attack would certainly qualify as a profound experience, but its not something you can go around triggering in people in order to stop them from smoking. Instead the aim is to use a powerful psychedelic trip to trigger a similar effect, an intense, abstract experience that changes the patients perspective.

    The secret to triggering this kind of experience is setting and context, Johnson explains. Our clinical impression is that those experiences are most likely to happen under conditions where
    the person is made to feel as safe as possible, that they've developed a very strong rapport with the people that they're with.
    We ask them to bring pictures of themselves over the years, family, people, places, and things. We've had people who have filled the room with pictures, explains Cosimano. Things that could be important to them, objects. People have set up altars. People bring stuffed animals or a blanket. Things that can make them feel comfortable, safe, cosy, meaningful.

    Garcia-Romeu and Cosimano show me the session room, the place where these rituals take place. Its pretty much exactly as theyd described it to me, a small, cosy room, softly lit with a comfortable couch. Books on Michelangelo and Van Gogh are scattered around. Theres an undeniable feeling of safety and comfort in the almost womb-like room, where volunteers spend up
    to six hours until the drugs effects have worn off, after which they are taken home by a member of their family.

    The trial program, small though it is, has produced tantalising results. Out of the 15 people, 12 were still smoke-free six months following the trials, according to the researchers. We think and hope there is something new going on here, says Johnson.

    Weve had people in this study claim extraordinary things, like that they don't feel nicotine withdrawal and they've been smoking for pack a day for 40 years. Just seeing that in one person
    is pretty profound.


    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2015...e-smokers-quit
    Last edited by mr peabody; 15-06-2018 at 06:18.
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    #28
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    Rapid method for interrupting tobacco dependency


    The administration of ibogaine to a nicotine or tobacco addict has been discovered to interrupt the physiological and psychological aspects of nicotine or tobacco dependency. A single treatment or series of treatments is effective for 1-18 months or longer. Treatment consists of oral, rectal infusion or suppository administration of ibogaine in dosage ranges of 1 mg/kg
    to 60 mg/kg.

    A single treatment or series of treatments of ibogaine in doses ranging from 1 mg/kg-60 mg/kg, administered orally or rectally, interrupted the use of nicotine and/or tobacco dependency. Studies in the rat have shown the most efficacious doses to be 40 mg/kg to 60 mg/kg, but the dose can be within the range of 1-60 mg/kg.

    In the administration of acceptable dosage forms, any of a variety of preparations may be compounded, for example: capsules, tablets, pills, powder, solutions, injections or suppositories.
    In addition to the active agent, there may be present additional substances used in the manufacture of pharmaceutical preparations such as binders, fillers and other inert ingredients.

    The advantage of this invention is that it allows for the rapid interruption of physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms associated with nicotine/tobacco use.

    The following examples are given to illustrate the present and improved method of treating nicotine abuse or dependency and are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention.

    EXAMPLE 1

    Subject, age 42, was smoking two or more packs of filter cigarettes per day. Subject was administered a single dose of 15 mg/kg of ibogaine. Subject suffered no nicotine withdrawal and
    has not smoked cigarettes for more than 24 months, at which time tracking ceased.

    EXAMPLE 2

    Subject, age 34, was smoking 1-1/2 half packs of cigarettes per day when given 15 mg/kg of ibogaine HCl. Cigarette smoking continued, but diminished over a 30 day period at which time
    the subject ceased to smoke cigarettes and maintained this state for sixty days, at which time tracking was discontinued.

    EXAMPLE 3

    Subject, age 36, had been smoking four to six cigarettes a day for a year. A single treatment with 25 mg/kg of ibogaine interrupted all tobacco use. Subject has had no desire to continue smoking and suffered no discomfort of nicotine withdrawal. Tracking was discontinued after 60 days.

    http://www.google.sr/patents/US5026697
    Last edited by mr peabody; 15-06-2018 at 06:19.
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    #29
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    Iboga therapy for nicotine addiction


    Every GP in Britain will know patients, friends, maybe even family who want to stop smoking but find it impossible to do so due to being addicted to tobacco. Although hypnotherapy can be
    very useful in treating tobacco addiction, it only addresses the psychological aspect of the addiction, not the physiological addiction that keeps so many nicotine users addicted years after they make up their minds to stop.

    A little-known traditional medicine that interrupts this dependence and alleviates cravings by stopping withdrawal symptoms is found in the botanical kingdom. This medicine acts to interrupt nicotine addiction at dosages so low that no other noticeable psychological or physical effects are encountered, allowing tobacco addicts a window of freedom from physiological dependence. With a little willpower they can then overcome their addiction completely and stop smoking permanently.

    The medicine, called Iboga, has been a central part of spirituality for the people of western Central Africa for millennia. The active constituents derived from the root of this tree are several alkaloids, predominantly ibogaine. Since the discovery of Ibogaine, extensive clinical and academic research has been done on ibogaine, underwriting the efficacy of its practical application in addiction therapy.

    Iboga treatment clinics have been established in Canada, the Netherlands, Mexico, South Africa and New Zealand, while underground iboga therapy is occasionally found elsewhere. However, due primarily to emphasis on treating addiction to the illegal drugs heroin and cocaine, its ability to effectively interrupt nicotine addiction and craving at sub-threshold dosages is still virtually unheard of.

    In the context of drug addiction, dependence is defined as how difficult it is for the user to quit, and the relapse rate, the rating users give their own need for the substance and the degree
    to which the substance will be used in the face of evidence that it causes harm.

    Under this definition of dependence, nicotine has a higher danger of dependence than alcohol, cocaine or heroin. The Royal College of Physicians 2000 report on nicotine addiction concludes that cigarettes are highly efficient nicotine delivery devices and are as addictive as drugs such as heroin or cocaine. Furthermore, the addition of additives to artificially increase addiction is a standard practice in the tobacco industry.

    Two-thirds of smokers start before age 18. In 2014, just over a half (51 percent) of regular smokers reported that they had tried to give up smoking. Of those who have tried smoking tobacco between one-third and one-half will become addicted. 60% of smokers say they would find it difficult to go a single day without smoking, and 70% have their first cigarette within an hour of waking. Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) research has shown that the total cost to society of tobacco-related In contrast to the sub-threshold dosages of Iboga for treating nicotine addiction, Iboga is taken at much higher dosages, 10 or more times higher for treating opiate addiction than by local indigenous people.

    Iboga is not a replacement for tobacco, it is not at all addictive itself and once the physiological addiction of nicotine has been interrupted Iboga never needs to be taken again. Although Iboga may have some psychoactive effects at much higher dosages, these effects are completely absent at the low dosages necessary to inhibit nicotine addiction and withdrawal.

    Iboga is not considered a recreational drug and has no potential for recreational use or abuse. Confirmed and anecdotal reports from the field indicate that around a gram of dried Iboga rootbark material when eaten effectively stops nicotine craving and interrupts the physiological addiction of tobacco for approximately 12 hours, with no other noticeable effects. If repeated for a few consecutive days, around a week, the physical withdrawal and associated craving for nicotine will be completely absent during this time. The absence of nicotine from the bloodstream then allows the tobacco addiction to be vanquished.

    https://dogta137.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/iboga.pdf
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    Blind Faith Had To Cry Today


    Psilocybin proven to help long-term smokers quit


    Weve come a long way from doctors endorsing cigarettes and authority figures saying nicotine is perfectly safe, but even in this day and age when we know that tobacco is the single leading cause of preventable death,1 millions of people still smoke and many of them are struggling to quit. Finding ways to help people who are physically and psychologically addicted to smoking is hugely important for public health, and recent scientific trials are showing that the brightest ray of hope for tobacco addicts lies in an unlikely source- hallucinogenic mushrooms.

    Trials using psilocybin mushrooms have helped long-term smokers understand the roots of their addiction, tracing inside themselves not just the physical craving, but a deeper knowledge of the mental symptoms that lead to their behavior. Addictions can come in many forms and for many reasons, and can be incredibly destructive. The implications of psilocybin mushrooms on addiction research could help us break through one of societys most damaging problems.

    The Johns Hopkins Study

    In a study published in 2014 in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, Johns Hopkins researchers reported that using psilocybin mushrooms in tobacco addiction therapy achieved an unprecedented 80% success rate, helping 12 of 15 heavy smokers to be tobacco-free 6 months after their psychedelic treatment sessions. The participants smoking habits were roughly
    a pack a day for over three decades on average, which makes the results even more incredible. Some of the subjects had tried psychedelics before, but only minimally and in the distant past.

    The results of the Johns Hopkins study are particularly exciting due to the fact that the leading prescription drug for tobacco addiction treatment, varenicline, has only a 35% success rate and comes with a slew of side effects including headaches, nausea, and even of suicidal behavior. Instead of being on a regular regiment of dangerous prescription drugs like varenicline, the subjects in the psilocybin study were only administered three doses of mushrooms in a safe and supportive therapeutic environment, and the effects were long lasting. This has major implications for the future of tobacco addiction treatment and psychedelic therapy in general, as the process is far safer than using prescription drugs, and the results are exemplary.

    Beyond Addiction

    Psilocybin mushrooms have long been associated with mystical experiences, and while science has a hard time grasping the spiritual, these experiences can be measured. In addition to the benefits to the subjects ability to quit smoking and remain off tobacco for an extended period of time, 13 out of 15 (87% reported that they would count their therapeutic experiences on psilocybin among the ten most meaningful experiences of their lives2 (something that stands in stark contrast to the reports of suicidal behavior on varenicline).

    As with most addictions, the substance of choice is not so much the cause of a persons problems, but a symptom of unreleased stress, trauma, unhealthy patterns, or emotions that have not had a chance to heal and be released. Psychedelics like psilocybin mushrooms are uniquely equipped to reorient peoples perspectives on their life choices, and allow them a rare opportunity to make meaningful and lasting positive changes in how they live their lives. As Matthew Johnson of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine says, Quitting smoking isnt a simple biological reaction to psilocybin, as with other medications that directly affect nicotine receptors. When administered after careful preparation and in a therapeutic context, psilocybin can lead to deep reflection about ones life and spark motivation to change.

    Addiction to drugs, to cigarettes, to shopping, to work, to sex, to cutting, or to anythin, can ruin a persons life. It can harm everyone around them. The costs can be extraordinary, to both the individual and to society. As a country we spend billions every year in treatment, oftentimes after people are past the point of no return. With treatment from psilocybin mushrooms, our ability to understand and stop addiction before it becomes ruinous increases. With more research, we may be able to kick our habits.

    https://psychedelictimes.com/psilocy...-smokers-quit/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 15-06-2018 at 06:17.
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    #31
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    06-11-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Mananas View Post
    I'm sorry, I might very well be mistaken here, so correct me if I'm wrong, please! - but isn't the closest compound to LSD: LSA? The natural form of LSD in the form of seeds? A very similar chemical formula...
    Quote Originally Posted by Xorkoth View Post
    Similar, but in fact ALD-52 and 1p-LSD are much, much closer. ETH-LAD and AL-LAD are also closer. LSA is similar but it's a very different type of experience from LSD.
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    #32
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    Janis Joplin, Big Brother and the Holding Company Oh, Sweet Mary


    Magic mushrooms worked for me, I lost all interest in pot and cigarettes.

    -Trevor Crozier

    -----

    Psychedelic mushrooms helped me kick a 30-year nicotine addiction all in one long night of the soul. Ten years later, I have never smoked again.

    -Tony Spencer

    -----

    I smoked for 20 years, tried quitting a few times. Last year I found a giant patch of cyanescens and ate so many I woke up the next day and haven't smoked since.

    -yesi canhula

    -----

    After years of trying and failing to quit smoking using conventional methods, I chanced upon a study showing that psilocybin had an 80 per cent success rate in the treatment of nicotine addiction. With the help of a top mycologist and a mental health professional nobody is advocating the use of these drugs without proper guidance and supervision. I went on a magic-mushroom-picking trip, followed by a magic-mushroom trip. When I came out the other side, the urge to smoke was gone. I havent touched a cigarette since.

    -Charlie Gilmour

    -----

    Microdosing mushrooms helped me quit smoking. The days that I would microdose would feel 100 times easier to ignore cigarette cravings. I felt like I was already satisfied and did not need
    to reach for cigarettes for any reason.

    -mackraslo

    -----

    I had been trying to quit smoking cigarettes, but I could never could get past the first week. Started microdosing mushrooms, 0.25 gram every 3 days, for mental benefits/ increase work productivity. After about a month of microdosing I attempted to quit smoking (again) and to my surprise felt no adverse effects. I prepared myself for shitty irritating days ahead but to my surprise they never came. Fast forward two weeks and still no smokes, I'm now speculating this is because of the microdosing. Due to the weird once every three day schedule I ended up missing two days, I was having such bad nicotine withdrawal I almost got out of my car to yell at a middle aged woman in a parking lot... who I cut off by driving like an ass. I had to step back and think why am I so irritated today... two weeks after quitting? Oh shit, it really is the mushrooms! I went straight home, took my dose and within an hr felt totally fine again. I'm writing this three months later, totally nicotine free. I ran out of mushrooms one month after quitting (over all I took them one month before quitting one month after quitting). I still have zero want or urge to smoke or consume nicotine.

    -squidster42

    -----

    I quit smoking after 43 years by microdosing. It never occurred to me that the cravings were lessened by the shrooms. I would get a craving, but a simple deep breath and "noticing" of the craving would drop it immediately. Some 5 years after, I still get cravings, but the same deep breath still works.

    -RunAMuckGirl
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    #33
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    Iboga and nicotine

    Iboga will help but it will not stop smoking for you. It will however switch off the cravings and give you a chance. It will tell the nicotine to shut the hell up for a little while.

    However you will always have to consider YOUR want for nicotine - not just nicotine's desire to remain within you. It takes two to tango as is the phrase. If you fill all the gaps in your life which you normally substitute with tobacco then it's much easier to quit.

    The most important thing is giving yourself permission to take a break. People go out for smoke breaks all the time and nobody bats an eyelid. But 90% of the time they do it to move away from stress, rest for a bit, then move back, under the auspices of having a smoke. So give yourself permission to relax anyway, without a crutch. Take a 5 minute "smoke break" and if anyone looks at you funny tell them to f*** off.

    Also, switch to additive free rolling tobacco (e.g. American Spirit) so you can eliminate the addiction to the additives in cigarettes.

    Find the original trigger point of a nicotine craving in yourself. This originates at the amygdala. It will feel like this really silent pulse; this pulse activates a cascade of things and then you start getting the feeling of really needing a smoke. It can be as long as 0.25 seconds between that pulse and the emotional response although usually it is nearly instantaneous.

    That silent pulse is the killswitch to the addiction. Switch this off (it's VERY easy) and the addiction will disappear like it was never there, zero withdrawals. The Allen Carr method essentially teaches someone how to sense it and observe it clearly for one, which is why it works. It didn't work for you because your perception of the book did not lead you to isolating that pulse.

    Once you do see and behold with clarity this amygdala spark, the addiction is nothing. Deciding not to trigger this pulse is no different to wiggling your finger.

    So to summarise, this is what you will feel:

    [smoking-related cue OR ~1hr since last cig] => (silent amygdala pulse) => blood flow change => emotions change => voice in mind says "I need a cigarette"

    The whole process happens very fast but every craving has a beginning, so it's easy to find it. Also you must eliminate all smoking related cues from your reality for around 2 weeks: do not hang around smokers, or drinkers for that while, do not try to smell smoke or see a lit or unlit cigarette. Do not write yourself a check that your willpower can not and will not cash.

    This reduces the fight down to a single repeating cue: the one you get each time nicotine levels in your body drop to a threshold where they no longer satisfy and consequently the amygdala signals it's time for a smoke.

    -embracethevoid
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    #34
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    Sly Stone I Want To Take You Higher


    I quit smoking with psilocybin

    Weve already seen the potential of psychedelics to help people with alcohol addiction; and next to alcohol, tobacco is the one of the most addictive and harmful drugs in the UK. Recent evidence suggests that psilocybin could be used to help treat smoking addiction – and it could even be an improvement on current treatments.

    In 2014, a group in Baltimore began a pilot study using psilocybin-assisted therapy to help people quit smoking, funded in part by the pioneering Beckley Foundation. They recruited 15 smokers, who on average had been smoking for thirty years and attempted to quit several times. The smokers went on a 15-week course of psychotherapy, during which they were given three doses of psilocybin. Six months after the study, 80% of the participants were abstinent from smoking – as indicated by physiological tests and questionnaires.

    The same group then released a follow-up study: 12 months after the treatment, 67% of participants were abstinent. At 16 months, 60% still weren’t smoking. These results are much more impressive than those from typical smoking cessation treatments, that show around 30% abstinence after 12 months.

    Unfortunately, like many open-label trials, there are flaws in this study. The group of participants was small, which could affect the results. There were no controls, so we have no idea how well the participants would have done on a long course of psychotherapy alone (although other studies using a similar length of therapy showed lower abstinence rates than this psilocybin study). Additionally, the physiological measures of smoking cessation only cover six days prior to the test; so it’s possible that at the long-term follow-ups, participants had been smoking since the initial treatment (however, these are standard measures in most smoking cessation studies).

    A final note about psilocybin: Most treatments for smoking addiction approach it like a disease of brain, with receptors that need to be targeted. But the beneficial properties of psilocybin could stem from something closer to behavioral therapy. Almost all of the participants in this psilocybin study said their experience was one of the five most meaningful experiences of their lives: and that doesnt sound much like a typical medication. Previous studies have shown that psilocybin can help people break free of robotic thinking, and help them become more open (a personality trait that usually remains stable during adulthood). It’s possible that psilocybin, used as a therapeutic tool rather than a drug attacking a disease, could help us in many areas of psychiatry.

    https://thepsychedelicscientist.com/...ybin/#more-599
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    The Verve A Man Called Sun


    Pilot Study of the 5-HT2AR agonist Psilocybin in the Treatment of Tobacco Addiction

    Matthew W. Johnson, Albert Garcia-Romeu, Mary Cosimano, and Roland R. Griffiths

    Despite suggestive early findings on the therapeutic use of psychedelics in the treatment of substance use disorders, rigorous follow up has not been conducted. To determine the safety and feasibility of psilocybin as an adjunct to tobacco smoking cessation treatment we conducted an open-label pilot study administering moderate and high doses of psilocybin within a structured 15-week smoking cessation treatment protocol. Participants were 15 psychiatrically healthy nicotine-dependent smokers, with a mean of 6 previous lifetime quit attempts, and smoking a mean of 19 cigarettes per day for a mean of 31 years at intake. Biomarkers assessing smoking status, and self-report measures of smoking behavior demonstrated that 12 of 15 participants (80 percent) showed seven-day point prevalence abstinence at 6-month follow-up. The observed smoking cessation rate substantially exceeds rates commonly reported for other behavioral and/or pharmacological therapies (typically less than 35 percent). Although the open-label design does not allow for definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy of psilocybin, these findings suggest psilocybin may be a potentially efficacious adjunct to current smoking cessation treatment models.

    This study illustrates a framework for future research on the efficacy and mechanisms of hallucinogen-facilitated treatment of addiction. It is the first study to examine a 5-HT2AR agonist
    in the treatment of tobacco addiction, and illustrates a viable framework for psilocybin-based addiction treatment interventions. An estimated 5 million worldwide deaths per year are caused by tobacco use, and those numbers are projected to rise to over 8 million deaths annually by 2030. Given the global scope of smoking-related mortality, and the modest success rates of approved smoking cessation treatments, the novel approach presented here warrants further investigation with a randomized controlled trial.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286320/
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    01-03-2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Torresmo View Post
    I`m a smoker for 10 years and have been smoking a lot lately. The need to quit is something I constantly think about, so after postponing a lot I decided to take action.
    I always suffer a lot with withdrawal symptoms when I try quitting (mainly a really bad mood), therefore on monday I started taking welbutrin. However, yesterday I read this thread and decided to give psychedelic therapy a try before taking antidepressants.

    Today I talked to a few friends and arranged to attend an ayahuasca ceremony in about 1 week from today. After the experiment I`ll come here and tell you guys if it helped me or not.

    I take ALD-52 and dissociatives quite frequently, but I always smoke a lot even when I`m on this drug. I even remember craving for a cigarette during a previous ayahuasca ritual, but my hope is, this time, with the right intent and focus, I`ll be able to work through that craving and learn to control it. So i`m pretty confident this might actually work!

    I am also considering consuming about 100-120mg (I.M) of ketamine on the day after, for it`s supposed anti-depressant effects. On that matter, what do you guys think? Is it a good idea? Maybe wait a few days more? Is this a good dose, or too strong? I snorted about 5gs of ketamine in a span of 2 weeks, a few weeks ago, so I have some experience, but not so much of a tolerance, as 100mg up the nose will put me quite close to a hole.
    Quote Originally Posted by HJ420 View Post
    Best of luck with quitting smoking. 120mg (IM) of K will give you pretty intense effects and will give anti-depressant effects, but I?m not sure how much it will help you quit smoking. I?ve been bumping some k all day and I still have urge to consume nicotine. That?s just me though.
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    How LSD helped me stop smoking

    By Daniel Miller

    Ultimately, the only thing that helped me quit cigarettes for good was an illegal drug that I had been taught to fear as much as heroin. The drug was LSD.

    I smoked a pack of cigarettes a day for almost a decade. I had tried to quit, but nothing worked. The patch gave me a rash. Nicorette gave me incessant hiccups. And neither reduced my craving for cigarettes.

    Chantix, which my doctor prescribed, worked, at least until I went to hospital with a severe allergic reaction. Ultimately, the only thing that helped me quit for good was an illegal drug that I
    had been taught to fear as much as heroin. This drug was LSD.

    And what's truly remarkable is that my experience wasn't a fluke. I'm not the exception. In a recent pilot study at Johns Hopkins, 80 percent of the participants were nicotine free six months after two or three psilocybin sessions. And other promising research shows the efficacy of psychedelics to treat alcoholism and even cocaine addiction.

    This seems like a miracle. But, of course, it's not. As an atheist, and somebody who spent four years studying physics at Princeton, I believe in science. Psychedelics aren't magic; they're a medicine under the right setting. And medicines obey the laws of nature?of cause and effect.

    So what exactly is going on here psychologically?

    After my experience, I engrossed myself in the psychedelic literature. I read dozens of books about these powerful drugs, searching for the answer to what happened to me. The problem was that I was searching in the wrong place. I was learning a lot about psychedelics, neuroscience and even religion, but not nearly enough about addiction.

    And then I read Johann Hari's new book, Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, and it made sense to me for the first time. Hari makes the point that addiction isn't a function of the chemical, it's a function of your cage. And maybe what my experience had done was so improve the conditions of my cage that I no longer wanted to escape from it with nicotine.

    Some background on Hari's book (and a recently released video summarizing his thesis) would be instructive here. In the rat cage experiment made famous by the "Just Say No" campaigns of the 1980s, rats were given a choice between regular water and heroin-laced water, and almost every time they would drink the drug water, become addicted and eventually overdose.

    The problem with this study and the addiction model it supported was that it ignored the fact that these rats were in an empty cage. A follow-up study replaced the empty cage with something resembling a rat park (or rat heaven) filled with other rats to have sex with, balls to play with and colorful objects to look at. This time, the rats rarely drank the drug water and never became addicted.

    And this "cage" theory of addiction seemingly translates to human beings. During Vietnam, close to 20 percent of returning veterans had a dependency on opium. But a year after their return, 95 percent were drug free. If you replaced constant fear of dying in a jungle war with a peaceful life filled with friends and family, the addiction went away.

    What's interesting and different about my example is that psychedelics didn't change the physical parameters of my cage. Unlike the Vietnam veteran, nothing materially changed about my life, either in terms of what people I spent time with, or what I did every day. So then what gives?

    Human beings strive to feel connected. And Hari notes that in the absence of meaningful human connections, we resort to less productive attachments, from our iPhone and Twitter to cigarettes and even heroin.

    And personally, I had always struggled to create and maintain fulfilling human connections; I was simply too defensive and judgmental. Even among my close friends, there was always something to criticize. In other words, when I looked inside my "cage," I saw something broken, a series of things that had gone wrong. No wonder I wanted to smoke a cigarette every 30 minutes!

    But after taking LSD, my worldview shifted. Whereas before I saw life as some sort of competition between me and the world, I now feel like I'm one part of a larger whole. I've always had the capacity to empathize, but I had reserved these feelings for a select few that "deserved" it. My psychedelic experience forced me to consider that we all might deserve it. And in return, my relationships with others have flourished.

    I quit smoking "cold turkey" before I took LSD. But the insights from my "trip" have sustained that initial decision and kept me off nicotine ever since. Before my experience, there was a struggle every day between my will to quit and a desire for my old friend "the cigarette." This was both unpleasant and, I believe, untenable.

    But afterward, it was just easy. There was no struggle because I no longer desired cigarettes. One of the participants in the Johns Hopkins smoking cessation study was quoted in a New Yorker article as saying: "Smoking seemed irrelevant so I stopped."

    Put another way, given her new perspective, she had better things to do in her rat cage than smoke cigarettes. Or at least, this is how I felt. Psychedelics had provided me with a set of spiritual and emotional options and an ability to relate to others that was far preferable to the nicotine high.

    The science behind my experience is becoming clearer every day. Scientists from Johns Hopkins, NYU, UCLA and Imperial College London believe that psychedelics can induce profound spiritual insights by temporarily turning off or turning down the Default Mode Network, the part of the brain responsible for our ego and sense of self.

    This certainly comports with my personal experience, and to the results from the scientific studies. But in some ways, the science is irrelevant. After taking LSD, I'm far more compassionate and empathetic, and less self-conscious than I used to be. And just as important, I'm smoke free. Cigarettes still seem "irrelevant" to me.

    We have strong evidence that taking a psychedelic only once or twice can effectively treat if not cure addiction. We shouldn't be afraid to embrace this knowledge in order to combat one of the most intractable diseases afflicting our society today.

    And perhaps this is even bigger than that. Couldn't we all use our own little rat heaven? After all, aren't we all addicted to something?

    Daniel Miller is a lawyer, writer, and founder of the Psychedelic Society of Brooklyn, a group whose goals are to build community, educate the public about the benefits of responsible legalization, and engage in local advocacy. He recently wrote an article for Newsweek on psychedelics and addiction. He is a graduate of Princeton University (A.B. Astrophysics 2005)
    and Georgetown Law School (J.D. 2011). After graduating law school, he clerked for a Federal Judge in the Northern District of Ohio.
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    The LSD trip that made me quit cigarettes

    This was definitely the best experience that I have had with psychedelics in my life as I had the first motivation to quit my cigarette addiction which started when I was fourteen. I usually smoked a pack of this cancer sticks per day of different contraband brands because they were cheaper (red point menthol, red point red, fox, Jaisalmer, etc.) and my occasional lucky strike, Pall Mall and Phillip Morris. The thing is that I really wanted to quit them this year.

    Since I quit my lungs feel so light, I feel so grateful of life and my focus capacity has improved over time. Tobacco is such a pointless addiction. I had also been dealing with a lot of profound depression at that time and with a lot of depressive/suicidal thoughts...

    The last thing I did before tripping was write down the reasons why I wanted to quit, think about the idea of quitting, threw away a homemade can ashtray, the empty packets I had, lastly I placed all matches and lighters I had in a jar in the garden so I would have a bad time if I went looking for a lighter.

    The trip started after a night of no sleep after taking 80 Mg of Ritalin, I had this Hoffman LSD tab I bought and it was great actual LSD (tested). So in the morning I researched about nicotine abstinence being as horrible as opiate withdrawal, I saw the best wikihow guide on how to quit smoking and some YouTube guides. The first thing I did was I cut the blotter in half with a razor blade due to the unknown strength of it, so I had two great doses.

    So it was morning and I ate breakfast. After that I took half a tab, and after twenty minutes I felt motivated and the trip started. I was walking around my garden and it just looked gorgeous.
    Then I changed clothes and put swimming shorts to go to the pool because this was a summer day and I wanted to enjoy the last of this amazing season. As soon as I was on my way to the pool I encountered my mom and dad, and I told my mother I was quitting cigarette. She was really happy and said that it was a point of maturity that you notice as you get older.

    I jumped into the pool and when I went underwater I felt the cold water alleviating the first signs of nicotine withdrawal. Thanks to LSD I quit cigarettes, and the last time I ever smoked was
    at a party when I dropped the other half. After that I never smoked another cigarette! It was an amazing experience....

    https://steemkr.com/lsd/@endless.drugs/the-lsd-trip-that-made-me-quit-cigarettes



    Jefferson Airplane If You Feel
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 03:19.
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    19-03-2018

    Quote Originally Posted by Torresmo View Post
    Just to report back... Things didn`t go like I expected. First of all, the brew was kinda weak this time and I don`t think I got strong enough dmt effects. I don`t feel like it was a very strong ayahuasca session overall...

    So yeah I am still pretty much addicted to nicotine. Though I don`t think the potency of the brew is not the only thing to blame, I have the feeling things just don`t work as I expected, in an immediate way,
    but maybe this could be effective in mid to long-term.

    Still... wish to keep going to ayahuasca sessions, because I feel it is good to me anyway as quitting cigarettes is not my sole objective doing this...
    Last edited by mr peabody; 15-06-2018 at 04:29.
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    Moby Grape Ain't No Use


    Psilocybin gave me the desire to quit smoking


    I always knew I shouldn't smoke, but everyday pressures override common sense. Psilocybin allowed me to view my life with a fresh perspective and 'reset' some of the harmful aspects
    of my lifestyle. That new insight made me want to change. So I made some drastic changes, and I continue to reap the benefits of my experiences to this day, and I feel I have deeper understanding of myself, others, and the world around me.

    I didn't use any other Tobacco replacement therapy or treatment, nor did I feel I needed it. The mushroom trip was the catalyst, and cannabis eased my withdrawal symptoms from the nicotine. I quit first try, and have no desire to start again. I no longer live with the nagging craving for Tobacco, which controlled my mood and how I went about my day.

    The impact on me was so profound, it is almost unbelievable. I only wish everybody had access to such treatment. Nicotine patches and e-cigarettes are great for stopping the physical
    act of lighting a cigarette, but you are still dependent. You need to want to break the physical dependence, or your lifestyle will never change. Psychedelics can instigate that desire.

    After a mushroom trip, smoking tobacco and getting drunk seemed like the most pointless activities. They offer no real benefit, they only dull the senses. Psychedelics heighten them.

    -strongtothefinish

    -----

    Psychedelics have an amazing capacity to forge new neural paths very quickly. I was a pack a day smoker for 3 years, took LSD, assessed the addiction, realized it made me feel shitty
    and that I didn't even like the feeling of nicotine. Quit the next day and haven't looked back.

    -phat_connall

    -----

    I took 0.25 grams of psilocybin every 3 days for 2 months with no negative side effects. I am now 3 months free of nicotine and still have no urge to smoke even around heavy smokers.

    -squidster42

    -----

    I believe that with the advent of acid, we discovered a new way to think, and it has to do with piecing together new thoughts in your mind. What is it about it that scares people so deeply? It's because they're afraid there's more to reality than they have confronted, that there are doors they're afraid to go in. And they don't want us going in there either, because if we do we might learn something they don't know. And that puts us beyond their control.

    -Ken Kesey


    Last edited by mr peabody; 16-06-2018 at 04:55.
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    I came to the Amazon for an ayahuasca healing, and I was introduced to a shaman. I told him I was basically a happy person but I have this “dark cloud” that was the bane of my existence, my addiction to cigarettes, a pack a day for 27 years. Ayahuasca is one of the most potent natural hallucinogens in existence. It comes from the vine of a tree and the shaman prepares it in
    a liquid form.

    After listening to my case for why I had come to him the shaman inquired, “Have you ever done ayahuasca with any other shaman to cure this problem?” I said no. The shaman instructed me to fast the entire day and to hike four hours in the jungle while he prepared the ayahuasca for that evening.

    That evening the ayahuasca ceremony took place in a round straw hut with a fire in the middle and an opening in the roof for the smoke to escape. The ayahuasca the shaman prepared was a neon orange liquid. It tasted terrible. I was given a shot, followed by a slug of crude alcohol.

    The shaman wore a pair of loincloth-like shorts. Entranced from the ayahuasca, he softly wailed an eerie sing-song. His chanting put me in a different space, even though I wasn’t hallucinating. After about a half hour, the shaman told me to go to bed, adding these promising words, “When you awake in the morning you will be cured.” The ayahuasca kept me up all night, but although I didn’t sleep, the next morning I felt rested as if I had slept 8 hours.

    Since my ayahuasca healing I have not once been tempted to smoke. Where I used to have to rally my will power to stop smoking, now the mere smell of tobacco nauseates me. Shamans call it shape shifting. I believe my shaman cured me of the turbulence that had manifested itself through my loathsome addiction.

    -greececyclinggoddess
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    For decades research on ibogaine has been stymied by its classification as a Schedule I drug, yet the results of animal studies are intriguing. A study from 2015 found that noribogaine, the substance that ibogaine breaks down to when ingested, reduced self-administration of nicotine in addicted rats by 64 percent. And the mechanism of action at the molecular level is peculiar, wholly unlike that of traditional drugs. Most active compounds work by binding to a receptor on the outside of a cell membrane. But ibogaine seems to do the opposite, binding to the inside of the membrane, something no other naturally occurring molecule is known to do.

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...-psychedelics/

    -----

    Johns Hopkins researchers report that a small number of longtime smokers who had failed many attempts to drop the habit did so after a carefully controlled and monitored use of psilocybin
    in the context of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment program. The abstinence rate for study participants was 80 percent after six months, a quit rate simply unprecedented in smoking cessation research. A follow-up study from the same group found that 16 months after the therapy, 60% of the participants were still abstinent, significantly higher than the 30% abstinence found in similar trials of other treatments after 12 months.

    http://howtousepsychedelics.org/quit-smoking/

    -----

    A recent pilot study found that 2-3 moderate-to-high doses (20 and 30 mg/70 kg) of the serotonin 2A receptor agonist, psilocybin, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation, resulted in substantially higher 6-month smoking abstinence rates than are typically observed with other medications or CBT alone.

    All 15 participants completed a 12-month follow-up, and 12 returned for a long-term (≥16 months) follow-up, with a mean interval of 30 months between target-quit date (i.e., first psilocybin session) and long-term follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, 10 participants were confirmed as smoking abstinent. At long-term follow-up, nine participants were confirmed as smoking abstinent. At 12-month follow-up 13 participants rated their psilocybin experiences among the five most personally meaningful and spiritually significant experiences of their lives.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27441452
    Last edited by mr peabody; 12-06-2018 at 23:27.
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    Jack Bruce


    Online Survey: Tobacco smoking cessation associated with psychedelic use

    Matthew W Johnson, Albert Garcia-Romeu, Patrick Johnson and Roland Griffiths

    Data suggest psychedelics such as psilocybin and LSD may hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of addictions, including tobacco dependence. This retrospective cross-sectional anonymous online survey characterized 358 individuals (52 females) who reported having quit or reduced smoking after ingesting a psychedelic in a non-laboratory setting 1 year ago. On average, participants smoked 14 cigarettes/day for 8 years, and had five previous quit attempts before their psychedelic experience. Of the 358 participants, 38% reported continuous smoking cessation after psychedelic use (quitters).

    Among quitters, 74% reported >2 years’ abstinence. Of the 358 participants, 28% reported a persisting reduction in smoking (reducers), from a mode of 300 cigarettes/month before, to a mode of 1 cigarette/month after the experience. Among reducers, 62% reported >2 years of reduced smoking. Finally, 34% of the 358 participants (relapsers) reported a temporary smoking reduction before returning to baseline smoking levels, with a mode time range to relapse of 3–6 months. Relapsers rated their psychedelic experience significantly lower in personal meaning and spiritual significance than both other groups.

    Participants across all groups reported less severe affective withdrawal symptoms (e.g. depression, craving) after psychedelic use compared with previous quit attempts, suggesting a potential mechanism of action for psychedelic-associated smoking cessation/reduction. Changes in life priorities/values were endorsed as the most important psychological factor associated with smoking cessation/reduction. Results suggest psychedelics may hold promise in treating tobacco addiction as potentially mediated by spiritual experience, changed priorities/values, and improved emotional regulation.

    It is our hypothesis that administration of psychedelics under structured conditions may strongly increase the likelihood of motivational insights leading to persisting behavior change such as smoking cessation. Further, we propose that while these motivational insights from psychedelics occur and sometimes prompt people to quit smoking in recreational or non-clinical contexts, such effects are likely to lead to substantially higher probability of abstinence when smoking cessation is the a priori goal of the psychedelic experience, and when combined with effective behavioral therapy. Our findings, in combination with pilot laboratory results suggest that psilocybin and other serotonergic psychedelics may hold considerable potential in the treatment of tobacco, and possibly other substance use disorders, and should therefore continue to be examined as a pharmacological aid in the treatment of nicotine addiction.

    http://www.csp.org/psilocybin/Johnso...kingSurvey.pdf
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    Jefferson Airplane Crown of Creation


    Psychedelics could hold the key to helping nicotine-addicted people quit smoking

    For cigarette smokers, quitting can be an incredibly challenging experience. Approximately 480,000 Americans die every year from cigarettes, making it the single largest preventable cause of disease and death in the country. If that's not enough to convince smokers to quit, it's evidence enough of the power of nicotine addiction. So when Johns Hopkins University came out with a study on the effects of using psilocybin, the active hallucinogenic agent in "magic mushrooms," to help longtime smokers kick the habit, the results impressed many.

    In a carefully controlled setting, smokers were introduced to magic mushrooms three times over the course of two months, upping the dose of psilocybin each time. The study, which was published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, showed a smoking abstinence rate of 80 percent after six months. Compare that to the 35 percent success rate for varenicline, a prescription drug that is considered one of the most effective addiction treatment options for smokers, after six months, and it's easy to understand why this study provoked such excitement.

    Nicotine replacement and other behavioral therapies have success rates of less than 30 percent, according to the researchers.

    The average age of the study participants was 55, and they smoked an average of 19 cigarettes per day for 31 years. All had repeatedly tried and failed to quit; and while some had experimented with hallucinogens in the past (on average, 27 years before participating in the study), none had thought to use magic mushrooms to treat their nicotine addiction. But researchers are increasingly finding that psilocybin may have unexplored health benefits that could be applied in the context of cognitive behavioral therapy treatment programs.

    For example, psilocybin has also proven to be effective at treating depression, anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), as CNN reported.

    Researchers emphasize that these results are not meant to encourage smokers to perform do-it-yourself, magic mushroom therapy sessions for smoking cessation. Rather, the success of this clinic trial appears to demonstrate that, in controlled settings overseen by medical professionals, longtime smokers who are administered psilocybin pills can be effectively coaxed out of their addiction through behavioral therapy.

    "Quitting smoking isn't a simple biological reaction to psilocybin, as with other medications that directly affect nicotine receptors," Dr. Matthew Johnson, the study's lead author and an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, wrote. "When administered after careful preparation and in a therapeutic context, psilocybin can lead to deep reflection about one's life and spark motivation to change."

    Johnson plans to pursue further research into the use of psilocybin to treat smoking addiction, comparing the results to the success of using nicotine patches, and the researchers will "use MRI scans to study brain activity in participants."

    https://www.attn.com/stories/3773/mu...itting-smoking
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    Janis Joplin, Big Brother and the Holding Company Combination of the Two


    For more than 40 years, Charlie Bessant was that guy.

    The guy who’d slink out of every party to catch a smoke on the sly. Who’d walk for blocks late at night through his dicey DC neighborhood to score a pack of Marlboro Lights, no matter the weather.

    Bessant tried and failed to quit many times. He used the nicotine patch, gum—you name it.

    “I always thought, ‘I’m going to quit—this is my last pack,’ ” says Bessant, 64, now living in Silver Spring and semiretired from his work making mounts for museum exhibits. “A big percentage of packs I bought were the last pack I ever bought.”

    But on a fall day in 2009, Bessant walked into a building at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. In Room 3102, he was given a dark-blue capsule to swallow. He lay down on a couch and nestled inside a cocoon of blankets. He put on eyeshades and headphones and waited for the blue capsule to do its thing.

    And he never smoked another cigarette.

    Bessant’s method of kicking his cigarette habit was unorthodox, to say the least: The blue capsule contained a healthy dose of psilocybin, the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms. Bessant was a volunteer in the world’s only study investigating whether psilocybin can help cigarette smokers quit. Although most people associate the drug with tie-dye-clad college students and Phish concerts, scientists are discovering that when used in a carefully controlled research setting, psilocybin may achieve something far more powerful than a fleeting, rapturous high. It may actually change lives.

    • • •

    The smoking study—for now, a pilot feasibility study—is the brainchild of Matthew Johnson of Hopkins’s Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit.

    Johnson, 39, is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and probably the last person you’d associate with anything remotely psychedelic. Bespectacled and bearded, he has an earnest, reserved demeanor befitting a man whose CV is loaded with dense journal articles like “Replacing Relative Reinforcing Efficacy With Behavioral Economic Demand Curves.”

    Johnson grew up in Landover, the son of federal employees. He began his academic career as a computer engineer but was drawn to psychology. “For me, it’s so obvious that understanding the mind and brain is the most interesting thing there is,” he says. “What could be more important?”

    He earned a doctorate at the University of Vermont, where his dissertation was about the application of microeconomic theory to the decision-making processes of smokers, and then came to Hopkins as a postdoctoral fellow in 2004.

    Although his personal experience with addiction is limited to caffeine, he has spent much of his professional life teasing out its mysteries. “If you’re interested in understanding behavior, addiction is the big thing,” Johnson explains. “It’s behavior that’s stuck.”

    “The answer to my needs was no longer ciagrettes,” one of Johnson’s subjects says. “Smoking became irrelevant.”

    Hopkins turns out to be part of a burgeoning scientific renaissance of sorts. For decades, no human research was done with psychedelics. Widespread recreational use in the 1960s and ’70s, rendered the drugs virtually radioactive to serious scientists. In recent years, however, researchers are creeping back out of the woodwork, intrigued by the insight psychedelics may provide into the innermost workings of the mind as well as their promise of therapeutic applications.

    “Sometimes I feel like Rip Van Winkle,”
    says Johnson’s postdoctoral mentor, longtime Hopkins professor Roland Griffiths, a co-investigator on the smoking study. “These drugs were thrown into the deep freeze, and they’re fascinating compounds.”

    Griffiths authored a seminal 2006 study that ushered in a new era of psilocybin research. In it, an astonishing 67 percent of volunteers said that taking psilocybin was either the most meaningful experience of their lives or among the top five, an impression that held up even more than a year later. Additional studies are currently probing psilocybin’s potential to curb anxiety and depression in cancer patients and looking at how it may be used to jump-start or deepen a meditation practice.

    • • •

    Johnson was intrigued by older studies that used hallucinogens to treat alcoholism and heroin addiction, and he wondered if psilocybin could help smokers who had repeatedly failed at quitting.

    The connection is more intuitive than it might first appear. Psilocybin is known to induce transcendent mystical states virtually identical to those described throughout the centuries in religious and spiritual literature, and many addiction-treatment programs are rooted in some kind of spiritual epiphany. Bill Wilson, the cofounder of Alcoholics Anonymous, for example, quit drinking after an experience that involved seeing a bright light and feeling an overwhelming sense of freedom and serenity. There’s also anecdotal evidence that people sometimes quit smoking after recreational mushroom use.

    “They’ll say, ‘Lo and behold, I had a cigarette in my hand and thought: What in the world have I been doing?’ ” Johnson explains. “Psilocbyin opens a window of opportunity with a very altered experience of oneself and of oneself in the world.”

    Those mystical openings can elicit measurable differences in subjects’ behavior and personality, particularly in their acceptance of new ideas. The idea is to seize on that newfound perspective and to apply it therapeutically. The biological underpinnings of that change are still a mystery, but Johnson has recently partnered with the National Institute on Drug Abuse to conduct brain-imaging studies that might shed light.

    Volunteers in the smoking study, which began in 2008, are carefully screened and prepared with several sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy; they might, for example, be told to visualize laughing, healthy lungs. They then undergo three daylong psilocybin sessions several weeks apart, though some opt to stop after the second session.

    “For me, it’s so obvious that understanding the mind and brain is the most interesting thing there is,” says Johnson.

    Johnson and his team have the sessions down to, well, a science—he authored a 2008 article in the Journal of Psychopharmacology on how to conduct psychedelic research safely. The decor in Room 3102 might best be described as yoga-studio chic, with Tibetan peace flags and a Buddha statue. Tucked away on a bookshelf is a ceramic statuette in the shape of a cluster of mushrooms. The door is decorated with a print of an inviting path through a lush, wooded thicket.

    Participants bring family photographs or other familiar objects to muse on. They lie on the couch wearing eyeshades, snuggled under blankets, and listen to a program of carefully selected tunes ranging from Brahms to Indian world music. Two trained guides provide support and reassurance; smoking is not explicitly discussed. A physician is always on call, though studies have repeatedly shown psilocybin to be physiologically safe and not habit-forming.

    Exactly what happens on the couch is harder to explain. “You can’t really talk very intelligently about what it is you experience,” says Charlie Bessant, who tried psychedelics as a college student in the ’60s. He throws out terms like “geometric connectiveness” and “resonant vibration” and says it felt a little like taking flight. “Everything is inside you, and you’re inside everything that surrounds you,” he says. He was overcome with a profound sense of gratitude for being alive.

    Whatever happened during those seven or eight hours, the next morning Bessant’s urge for cigarettes was simply . . . gone. “The answer to my needs was no longer cigarettes,” he says. “Smoking became irrelevant.”

    • • •

    Outcomes like Bessant’s raise new possibilities in the war against cigarettes. Even the best smoking-cessation methods have limited efficacy; the drug Chantix has a success rate of less than 35 percent after one year and can have unpleasant side effects.

    Of the first five participants to complete the psilocybin study, four weren’t smoking at all a year later and one had cut back to a single cigarette every two weeks. In all, 12 out of 15 volunteers—or 80 percent—were entirely smoke-free after six months. “That really blows out of the water what traditional treatment shows,” Johnson says.

    “I’ve had colleagues who have studied some of the other techniques say, ‘I’ve never had five people in a row that have been this successful,’ ” Johnson says. He stresses the preliminary nature of these results as well as the tiny sample size. He also has no way of proving that it wasn’t the cognitive-behavioral therapy that did the trick. But Johnson is confident the results of this pilot are significant enough to shake loose funding for a full-scale clinical trial soon.

    In other words, he’s clearly onto something, and with 19 percent of American adults still smoking, that something is desperately welcome.

    “I don’t think we need something to get off smoking. What we need is something to stay off smoking,” says psychiatrist Herbert Kleber, head of Columbia University’s Division on Substance Abuse; he’s also a former two-pack-a-day smoker. “If this is a different mechanism and may lead to more prolonged abstinence, I think it’s worth a try. This is a very important addiction.”

    Kleber emphasizes the need for caution when working with hallucinogens, a point to which Johnson is keenly sensitive. Despite the potential for punch lines about his work, Johnson takes pains to underscore its seriousness and safety.

    “This doesn’t have a whole lot to do with someone taking mushrooms at a concert,” Johnson says. He likens it to the difference between receiving morphine in a hospital setting and seeing a heroin addict nodding off at a bus stop. Though the two situations involve similar substances, it’s all about the context in which they’re used.

    Johnson, who is married and lives not far from his Hopkins office, declines to say whether he ever gave mushrooms the old college try: “We just don’t talk about that. Our research is not about the researchers. It’s about the volunteers and their experiences.”

    • • •

    Roland Griffiths of Hopkins acknowledges that hallucinogen research still carries some “cultural baggage,” pointing out that the psilocybin protocol was “reviewed more closely than any other I’ve been involved with in the 40-plus years I’ve been at Hopkins.” But Johnson denies having been hindered in any way, except to say that the National Institutes of Health has yet to provide any funding for research into the therapeutic use of psilocybin.

    And while Johnson’s research veers into ethereal issues such as spirituality, he rejects the idea that there’s anything unscientific about it: “I take a very broad view. I don’t think anything is outside the realm of science. Science is a certain manner of addressing questions. The heart of that is empiricism, testing questions. It doesn’t matter what questions you bring to that.”

    Johnson and his colleagues have a guarded optimism about psilocybin’s potential to help with smoking, other addictions, and mental-health problems. “I don’t ever anticipate psilocybin treatment being ‘take two of these and call me in the morning,’ ” he says. Instead, he could see the treatment being done in a specialized setting similar to that for outpatient surgery. And he says the lessons learned from psychedelic research may lay the groundwork for one day allowing people to have the same kind of transformative experience—using something like breathwork or meditation—without drugs.

    “We’re in uncharted territory,” he says, a tinge of excitement in his normally steady tone. Particularly intriguing is the idea that hallucinogens might have psychological and behavioral effects long after they’re gone from a user’s bloodstream, a possibility that would fly in the face of all that traditional psychopharmacology has taught.

    “That’s very much outside the box,” Johnson says. “The word ‘paradigm’ is overused, but this work is introducing a new paradigm in medicine.”

    https://www.washingtonian.com/2014/01/07/professor-probes-psychedelic-drugs-for-a-cure-to-nicotine-addiction/


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    Quote Originally Posted by Elrik_Eriksson View Post
    For myself psychedelics helped me quit in a seemingly indirect way.
    I smoked because it was self destructive, and thats what I wanted. When I would take LSD I smoked far more than normal, roughly 3 times as much.
    Over time LSD and mushrooms slowly made it clear to me that I should fix certain aspects of myself, smoking just being one. It got to the point where for years I stopped psychedelics just to avoid that work.
    When the death of my father was looming I knew I had to 'clean house' and address some of my personal issues before I could go farther. I quit smoking at that point so I could get back to using psychedelics.
    When I did get back to psychedelics I finally managed to make some significant progress which eventually led to me radically improving my health and curing myself of multiple 'incurable' diseases.

    I never really thought of psychedelics as having made me quit, since my best childhood memories were chain smoking on LSD in the forest at night
    But in a way, I suppose they did.
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    One woman's story about how psilocybin helped her quit smoking

    Kathleen Conneally had smoked since she was 12, but one day in the spring of 2013, that changed in an instant. Conneally arrived at a lab in Baltimore that looked more like a cozy living room, with a cream-colored couch and paintings of mountains on the walls. She took a pill from a golden goblet and popped it in her mouth. Under the watch of a pair of trained guides, she began to see wild colors, shapes, and ideas.

    Conneally was a participant in an addiction study conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University, who wanted to determine whether the relentless pull of nicotine could be weakened by psilocybin.

    Conneally’s trip, the second in a series of three such “sessions,” was probably the best outcome the researchers could have hoped for. She saw herself as purple flower rising high above her earthly problems, which looked small and stupid by comparison. Even more measly and insignificant was an image of herself, huddled and puffing on a cigarette.

    “Just breathe, and there’s no smoke, and no chemicals, and no problems,” she recalled herself thinking.

    Leaving the lab 5 hours later, she was sure she would never smoke again. Before, the stresses of her life would stir an overwhelming desire for cigarettes. But now, she said, “I can just cross that off my list. I don’t have to do it anymore.”

    She hasn’t had a cigarette in more than three years.

    There were 15 people in Conneally’s study, and 12 of them quit smoking—a much higher success rate than the 35 percent or so who quit through other methods. A much larger study is now underway to verify the results.

    Matthew Johnson, an associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins and the lead author of the study, was interested in psilocybin because of the success researchers had in using LSD
    to treat alcoholics in the 1960s. He liked that psilocybin was shorter-acting than LSD and had less societal stigma. It also has few side effects or addictive properties of its own.

    According to Johnson, depression and addiction both involve a narrowing of vision—a tunnel that it takes a profound experience to suck someone out of. Psilocybin, he says, can foster something called cross-talk between regions of the brain that don’t normally communicate. Cross-talk, in turn, is associated with novel ways of looking at problems.

    They’re “dealing with stuff they haven’t dealt with in years or decades,” Johnson said. While tripping, “people reflect on their childhood, their parents, their siblings, all their relationships, their love life, their current relationships.” Meanwhile, their minds become a kaleidoscope: “Colors are brighter. The walls might be waving. There might be a halo around things,” he said.

    Addiction to cigarettes consists of much more than physical cravings. It’s social. At best, it’s a ritual, and at worst, a crutch. Psychedelics appear to help people go beyond physical cigarette cravings and examine what’s really making them smoke. “People will recognize this profound self-worth that they’ve dismissed,” he said. “They look at their life and see themselves as a miracle.”

    Though she began smoking during her troubled childhood, Conneally quit cold-turkey when she was 27. But she picked it up again in 2008, when her life was “pretty much falling apart,” as she describes it.

    That year, she turned 40, and the economy crashed. Conneally’s partner, Whitney, was laid off. Finances grew tight and difficult to manage, which felt cruelly ironic to Conneally, a certified public accountant.

    “Happy 40th birthday,” she thought. She reached, as she always had in pressure-cooker moments, for her cigarettes.

    This time, she figured she was never going to quit. She'd tried everything from gum to hypnosis. She white-knuckled through a few cold-turkey attempts and scared herself with how it made her scream at the kids.

    But when she heard about Johnson’s study, she thought, “why not?” A Dead-head back in the day, she was no stranger to trippy experiences. At least it would be fun, she thought.

    The first session was assuredly not. “I started to panic and have anxiety thinking that I wasn’t doing it right,” she said. She worried the trip wouldn't work, and as a study participant, she wouldn't be allowed to smoke when it was over.

    Johnson said some people don’t seem to enjoy their time on the drug. “Many times people say, ‘People do this for fun?! I don’t get that at all.’” The guides tell them to “just go with it.”

    Conneally sunk into a depression after the first trip. A few weeks later, she cried on her way to the second session.

    But this time, something was different. The music was better; she felt freer. “My spirit soared,” she said. “I had this great vision of rising above and being a goddess.” She saw her worries like ants in the distance: Her abusive father; the air-conditioning unit where she would hide from her family and smoke. The participants in Johnson’s study had weeks of talk therapy before they tripped. Now everything she had talked about with her counselors was coming together. “I just am,” she thought, “and I need to let go of this stuff.”

    A sense of mysticism seems central to the trip treatment. Eleven of Johnson’s 12 study subjects rated the psilocybin trip among the five most spiritually significant experiences in their lives. Some considered it a crash-course in mindfulness, or years of therapy crammed into a single day.

    Johnson cautions that his study doesn’t mean people should take mushrooms on their own to cure various ailments, or at all. People don’t necessarily need to take psychedelics to break free of their destructive brain patterns. It can happen with any mystical life experience—the kind that changes everything that comes afterward. Living in a foreign country, giving birth to a child, and even falling in love—all of these approach the brain-rearranging power of psychedelics, at least for some people.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...hrooms/487286/



    The Allman Brothers Band (1969) Don't Want You No More
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLA View Post
    I never used nicotine until after I stopped the benzos and opioids at 57. It's e-cigs. I know it not good for me but I don't think their as bad as regular cigarettes. No tar. My mom was a smoker, I'm almost certain she didn't stop when she was pregnant with me. Sometimes I think I must have been affected by that.

    So P, what's your best guess estimate for when psychedelic use for end of life and terminal illness will be widely accepted, if at all? He had good intentions but Leary really shouldn't have advised people to indiscriminately drop acid. It seemed to be clearly making progress in being recognized for it's potential benefits until then.
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    How I quit my 20-year addiction to smoking


    There seems to be a thousand different strategies out there to cure cigarette addiction? and Ive tried all of them. I started smoking at a very young age and I cant even remember a time
    when I didnt smoke. Smoking was as necessary in my life as air.

    But about five years ago, I decided enough was enough. I was determined to get rid of the crutch, and began trying different methods.

    Nicotine gum tasted like pepper to me and only caused me frustration. I remember chomping on it so hard that I thought I was going to chip a tooth just to get a little extra nicotine out of it. Hiccups were also a common occurrence with the gum.

    Then there was the time I tried a $150 prescription medication from a doctor. That was a literal nightmare! After experiencing extreme feelings of dark depression, I read through the 300 side effects and found that suicidal thoughts were on the list. Needless to say, I stopped taking it and lost that $150 dollars.

    I thought I had hit the jackpot with the eCigarette at first. I was blind. There was a period of about three months that I was able to use only the eCig, but I was still addicted to nicotine. Eventually, I got tired of it and the way it burned my throat, and switched back to real tobacco.

    I also tried going cold turkey on multiple occasions. My best attempt was four days and I felt that if I were to go any longer I would either end up in a straight jacket or a jail cell.

    One day I ran across an interesting article titled Hallucinogen in Magic Mushrooms helps Longtime Smokers Quit in Hopkins Trial. The success rate in this study, even after six months, was
    a whopping 80% with administration of psilocybin! Thats over double the success rate of any other method available. Having previous successes with entheogens eradicating depression and aiding issues of the spirit, I knew it was worth a shot.

    Why dont all smokers quit when they take magic mushrooms?

    Here is my take on it: In most cases, if I were to hand a screwdriver to a toddler, they wouldnt have a clue what to do with it. If one is given a tool with no understanding of its functionality
    or how to use it, then the tool is useless. In this same way, mushrooms require understanding and respect to be used effectively.

    The strategies that I needed to quit smoking using mushrooms became clear in the two months prior to my quit date. These strategies developed like a well-crafted blueprint for success that could be used and emulated.

    Good diet is imperative

    If someone eats a big greasy hamburger and fries before their trip, it probably isnt going to go well. Mushrooms have a tendency to react poorly with bad food, giving one the sensation of rotting in the gut.

    I generally tend to avoid most meat for at least three days before a trip, consume predominately healthy vegetables and fruits for those three days, and fast the night before.

    Intentions are everything

    Ive found that if I am ingesting any psychedelic, my original intention for the experience has a lot of bearing on what happens. I imagine many people are apprehensive the first time they try mushrooms. By projecting a positive and clear intention, I was able to influence the path of the experience. If someone is given keys to a car, with no destination in mind or any knowledge of where they are going, they will just drive around aimlessly for hours until they run out of gas. Psychedelics can work in this same way.

    I focused in clearly on what it was I wanted to accomplish. For two solid months I meditated on the fact that I was going to quit and allowed this idea to saturate my daily thoughts.

    Now, Im not saying that anyone must meditate for 2 months and have a clear plan in order to experience benefits from mushrooms. Many people responsibly take trips just to enjoy it and feel connected to the Earth, and I have no quarrel with this. The point I am trying to make is that mushrooms can be an extremely effective tool using the method Im describing.

    Nature is a must

    I cant stress this element enough. Mushrooms dissolve the boundaries between the individual and nature in such a way that we feel no separation. One becomes nature. It is here in Mothers womb that my healing took place. Camping near a waterfall was the way to go. I could feel myself being purified during my stay.

    I also learned a more precise tactic from Paul Stamets, the worlds leading mycologist (biologist specializing in the study of fungi), through an online video. Paul explained that he was able to cure stuttering by wrapping his arms around a tree during an intense mushroom trip. By doing this, he was able to connect with the root network in the brain and the tree at the same time. This is where one is able to reset addictive behaviors and habitual pathways.

    Using this technique, I was able to connect with my mind on a very deep level. This was kind of like plugging into a network? the original network. It was in this place of energy and light that the addiction was obliterated. The feeling I had could be related to pushing a reset button, although it was a lot more profound than merely pushing a button.

    I quit with no physical withdrawals!

    Not kidding. I had no physical withdrawals whatsoever! I had tried so many times and always experienced withdrawals. There was no voice in my head constantly telling me to smoke either.
    I just felt happy and free in the days after quitting.

    In the following weeks and months occasionally a stressful situation would trigger a craving, but these were easily dismissed. I knew I was no longer a smoker.

    After a few months of complete nicotine cessation, I realized I needed to get this story out there. I wrote a short kindle ebook titled How I Quit Smoking With Mushrooms, describing in much greater detail the tactics that I used to quit.

    It was definitely a life changing experience for me. I can finally breathe, run, and pursue a career as a dance fitness instructor. For five years Ive wanted to get into fitness, but until I quit I just never had the lung capacity.

    We need to change our perspective

    Genetically, mushrooms are more like us than plants. It seems to me they are able to bridge the gap between us and nature so that true communication can take place. This communication is far beyond words.

    In my opinion we need many more studies like the one that inspired me to quit smoking. Psilocybin is quite possibly the most effective cigarette addiction treatment of all.

    http://www.collective-evolution.com/...on-to-smoking/



    Last edited by mr peabody; 14-06-2018 at 00:50.
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