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    Treating cigarette addiction with psychedelics 
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    Welcome! Following is a DIGEST of articles and reports that is constantly updated.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This thread discusses self-treatment of cigarette addiction with psychedelics, especially LSD and psilocybin, substances that are currently illegal in many
    countries. There are, however, substances readily available which are closely equivalent.

    1. The substance most closely equivalent to LSD is ALD-52* (legal in most countries and easy to buy online).

    Exceptions:

    - United Kingdom: As of January 7th, 2015, ALD-52 is specifically named in the U.K. Misuse of Drugs Act as a Class A drug.
    - Latvia: ALD-52 is illegal in Latvia. Although it isn't officially scheduled, it is controlled as an LSD structural analog due to an amendment made on June 1, 2015.

    More information on this substance can be found here: https://psychonautwiki.org/wiki/ALD-52

    Dose:

    Micro 6 - 10ug
    Light 25 - 75ug
    Common 75 - 150ug
    Strong over 150ug


    *It has been postulated that ALD-52 can act as a potential trigger for those with underlying psychiatric conditions, so those with either a personal or family history
    of mental illness are generally advised not to use this substance.


    2. The substance most closely equivalent to psilocybin is 4-AcO-DMT (legal in most countries and easy to buy online).

    More information on this substance can be found here: https://psychonautwiki.org/wiki/4-AcO-DMT

    Exceptions:

    - Belgium: The import of 4-AcO-DMT is illegal.
    - Brazil: Possession, production and sale is illegal as it is listed on Portaria SVS/MS nÂș 344.
    - United States: 4-AcO-DMT is currently unscheduled in the United States, however, sale for human consumption, or use for non-medical or research purposes "could" be
    prosecuted as crimes under the Federal Analogue Act.

    - United Kingdom: 4-AcO-DMT is a Class A drug in the UK as it is an ester of the Class A drug psilocin.
    - Italy: This drug is illegal as it is an ester of an illegal substance.
    - Sweden: 4-AcO-DMT was made illegal in Sweden on 25 January 2017

    Dose:

    Micro 1 - 2 mg
    Light 3 - 7 mg
    Common 8 - 20 mg
    Strong 25+ mg


    CAUTIONARY GUIDELINES

    Certain people are much, much more sensitive to psychedelics than others, meaning their threshold dose is a small fraction of what others seem to be comfortable taking, so in general,
    never mind what people say.

    If you are prone to anxiety, steer clear of psilocybin, and never smoke weed before/during your trip. Start off with 1/3 tab (40ug) of LSD or ALD-52, and do that amount several times to establish your equilibrium. If all goes well, advance to 1/2 tab (60ug) and hold it there awhile. Advance no more than 1/4 tab (30ug) after that, and in general, dose only once in a session.
    I would avoid mixing any other drugs with psychedelics while you are finding your feet (say, for the first year). The best policy is always START SMALL AND INCH FORWARD.


    People diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, or people with biological parents or siblings diagnosed with a psychotic disorder should not take psychedelics, including LSD, psilocybin, DMT and LSA. Psychotic disorders include schizophrenia, delusional disorder, affective (mood-related) psychosis and others. Psychedelics may exacerbate symptoms of psychosis or trigger psychosis
    in people who were psychotic in the past, or with immediate family members who were or are psychotic.


    Taking psychedelics during or immediately after a period of emotional upheaval, such as a relationship breakup or the death of a loved one, may intensify negative emotions, even to a point that feels out of control.

    Psychedelics should only be taken when one feels confident and secure in his or her ability to handle a psychedelic experience and is confident in the stability of ones mind set.

    Psychedelics should only be taken in a place where one feels secure and with people they can trust.

    Psychedelics and some of the chemicals found in natural substances containing psychedelics can cause miscarriage. Do not take psychedelics if you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant.

    Use of some psychedelics is known to increase heart rate and blood pressure, so consult with your doctor if you suffer any conditions that would be negatively affected by this.

    Reynauds syndrome (cold-triggered reduction or loss of circulation in fingers and toes) will be made worse by taking a vasoconstrictor, and psychedelics are vasoconstrictors.

    People taking lithium should not use psychedelics. Anecdotal reports suggest lithium can greatly increase the psychoactive effects of psychedelics and that it can produce very unpleasant feelings, or even symptoms similar to epileptic seizures.

    Tricyclic antidepressants, such as Trofanil (imipramine), Anafranil (clomipramine) and others, and MAOIs taken along with psychedelics, may greatly intensify the psychoactive effects.

    People with serious liver problems should avoid psilocybin mushrooms as some might have compounds that could affect the liver.



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    The importance of using Regeant Test Kits


    Use a good scale!
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    *Accurate down to about 3mg. Put the weighing tray on after turning on the scale, factor the tray's weight into the amount you're weighing and triple weigh it just to be sure.






    Ibogaine helped me quit smoking cigarettes

    So a few weeks ago I went to Holland to take part in an Ibogaine ceremony. Ibogaine is a psychedelic plant from West Africa that has recently generated interest due to it's remarkable
    ability to interrupt addictions, most notably opiate addiction. I went for various reasons, but I'd like to share how successful Ibogaine has been in helping me to quit smoking.

    Personally, during my 15 hour long trip I saw visions of my childhood, had out-of-body experiences (such as being a gorilla) and in the process exorcised dozens of my demons, including self-hatred, guilt, perfectionism and compulsive behavior. I also had a spiritual awakening, where I felt the connection of all living things and understood more about the living universe.

    After the experience I lay in the grass as the effects wore off. I could smell the flowers, grass and my own pungent odor from the hours of sweating under the influence. I've never smelt
    like that before. It was beautiful!

    A bit later after some food, the thought popped into my head that I might have a cigarette, a thought that popped in due to shear habit as always coming along after eating.
    But this time, instead of feeling like I had to smoke, or that I was missing out by not smoking, I simply made the following deal with myself:

    If I can smoke that cigarette and keep this heightened sense of smell and taste then I'll do it... if I lose the beauty of these flowers and their aroma then sorry... it's just not worth it!

    Haven't smoked since, haven't wanted to smoke, have no withdrawal and feel amazing as a result!

    I don't know exactly how it worked. Iboga is a strange thing and a hell of a lot of stuff happened both during the journey and after. My guess is that Iboga reset my hormone levels so withdrawal didn't happen, helped me to understand the reasons I smoked and did a psychological reprogramming such that cigarettes no longer had power over me.

    There was another smoker in the group I should mention... she had smoked for 30 years and tried quitting with every method under the sun. She realized through a series of visions that when she was 15 and first moved away from her strict parents, the first thing she did was buy a pack of cigarettes. To her subconscious, cigarettes represented freedom and autonomy, and that's why it was so hard for her to stop smoking. Once she realized that, she figured out that her freedom came from within, not from the cigarettes, and thus her smoking addiction was gone too.

    Now, Iboga is a big ordeal, it's long, hard and will show you the cold hard truth. But it is a very gentle and loving experience that reminds you of what you love about yourself too!

    If quitting has been tough for you then it might be worth a look, particularly if you have some psychological issues that need resolving, too. It's like 10 years of therapy in a night, but you'll know if you're ready for that.You'll know when you're ready. It was a year after deciding I would do Iboga that I actually went, a tough year.

    I know this will sound a bit mad, but I believe Iboga calls you when it is time. I knew it was time to book myself in when within the space of a week 5 of my favorite podcasts mentioned Iboga (one was business podcast, one health, one Joe Rogan, etc.), just as a long personal challenge had ended.

    Don't rush it, though. I came close to selling all my possessions to get myself there, but I got a message that I had to take the step of staying disciplined, saving up carefully and preparing myself properly. Going on impulse would have been a waste of time and money.

    For the record, since the ceremony I have: -quit smoking -stopped drinking alone or to get drunk -not looked at porn -reconnected with my parents -stopped YouTube addiction -cured my social anxiety -found my courage -gave my number to a girl on the street for the first time in my life.

    Peace and love fellow quitters! It's much easier not to smoke than you think. You just need to change the way you think :-)

    -anonomousse





    I tried to quit smoking with magic mushrooms, and it worked.


    A recent study concluded that giving up smoking with the help of psilocybin has an 80 percent success rate. Conveniently, as "Stoptober" and mushroom-picking season perfectly intersect,
    I thought I'd give it a go.

    A golfer shakes his iron angrily in the air as we plough our buggy through the middle of his game. Dr. Brande, an international expert in the field of psychedelic mushrooms, cackles beside me. This has become a race against metabolism: return the vehicle before the drugs kick in.

    They have undeniably begun to kick in.

    We have not, as you might have guessed, come to this north London golf course to admire its famously majestic thirteenth hole. Rather, we are testing an experimental cure for one of mankind's greatest curses: cigarettes.

    I've tried everything: patches, gum, inhalers, faith healers; none of it seems to work. So when "Stoptober," that UK government-mandated holiday season for the lungs, rolls around, I greet
    it with a leathery wheeze of resentment. Surely there must be a better way?

    According to Johns Hopkins University, there is: magic mushrooms. Psychedelic mushrooms have, for fairly obvious reasons, attracted human interest for millennia. Seven-thousand-year-old Saharan cave paintings suggest ancient cults worshiped them; the Aztecs carried out healings with them; the Vikings made war with them; even Jesus, some claim, was actually just a magic mushroom in disguise.

    Now, thanks to science, our fungal friends can add the imminent destruction of the tobacco industry to their many great achievements. Psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, has an 80 percent success rate in the treatment of cigarette addiction, according to research carried out by the university. To put that in context, nicotine replacement therapies?such as patches or gum?hit around 20 percent. And yet, somehow, one year after that research was published, these lifesaving little shrooms are strictly forbidden.

    Lucky, then, that Stoptober and magic mushroom picking season perfectly intersect. According to Dr. Brande, within London, golf courses are the best bet.

    "We're looking for psilocybe semilanceata, a small, beige-brown mushroom more commonly known as the liberty cap," he says, as we nose our way around the course. "You'll see the cap sticking out of the grass. That's its really defining feature: a steep domed cap with a nipple on top. The nipples are essential."

    "Look, there's one!" says Brande. "Just peeping up above the grass!"

    It's a seemingly harmless little thing, but handling these mushrooms can have terrible consequences. "As soon as you pick it," says Brande, "you are guilty of possession of a class A drug."
    If I were to give this tiny mushroom to Brande, I could face a maximum of 14 years in prison for supply. So I don't; I eat it instead.

    The original study involved years of preparation. Carrying out human trials with Schedule I drugs?substances not recognized by the establishment as having any therapeutic value?is an extremely bothersome process. The subjects had to be prepped for months before being given their first dose.

    According to Dr. Matthew Johnson, one of the chief researchers on the project, much of that work involved simply preparing patients for the intensity of the psilocybin trip. "One can have these glorious, sometimes mystical, certainly intriguing effects," Dr. Johnson told VICE, "but also people can have what is sometimes described as the most frightening experience of someone's life. [The preparation] goes over a laundry list of all the kinds of things that can happen, and that's a really long list."

    A bad trip, probably the most common danger when taking hallucinogenic drugs, is, he says, simply a matter of bad perspective.

    "If your dead grandmother's crawling up your leg [during a bad trip]," says Johnson, "welcome your dead grandmother up your leg and ask her what she's there to tell you. Whether it's a monster or a dead grandmother, always take the orientation that this is something to learn from. Whether it's inviting or horribly frightening, always approach and learn."

    Participants in the study were carefully handled. They had comfortable settings, considerate guides and trained psychologists and medics on hand in case it all went wrong. Instead, we're driving the wrong way around a north London golf course, harvesting mushrooms as we go.

    One advantage we do have is the presence of Tom Fortes-Mayer, a Harley Street hypnotherapist who has agreed to act as guide and guardian throughout this process.

    "Usually when people come to give up smoking they feel like they're losing a naughty but slightly charming and faithful friend," says Tom. "Our job in the ritual we are going to perform is to change that perspective. Really, smoking is the kind of friend who, when you're not looking, goes upstairs and abuses your daughter."

    Telling someone who is coming up on mushrooms that they have a pedophile living inside them is an awful thing to do. But it's exactly this sort of thought process that makes psilocybin so effective in treating addiction.

    The drug, says Dr. Johnson, helps patients see their lives in perspective. It is, for many, a "mystical experience."

    "In these cases, it's striking that there's typically an overwhelming sense of unity," says Dr. Johnson. "A sense of feeling like you step out of time and space; a sense of paradoxicality; experiences of the ineffable; a noetic quality; a sense that somehow the experience is more real and valid than reality."

    Psilocybin may very well be a wonder drug?plenty of new research suggests that it is?but it is truly terrible for driving. My feet are at the pedals but Brande's hands seem to have taken
    firm control of the wheel. "I suggest we find somewhere quiet to perform the ritual," he says.

    What happens next is hard to describe. We lay down in a forest. The trees pulsate. With the Brande's guidance I travel deep, deep down into the ageless, genderless, timeless core of my consciousness and kick a few things around. I meet the part of my mind responsible for smoking and have a stern word. Other things occur, most of them too personal to relate.

    When I emerge, a million years later, smoking is simply something other people do. The illusion is shattered; the urge has gone. I see someone with a cigarette and feel precisely nothing.

    Over the week that follows I do all of the things that would normally have me reaching for cigarettes: leave the house, wait for a bus, do work, get drunk, go to parties, have arguments,
    drink coffee; in fact, thinking about it now, almost every major and minor event in my life was an occasion for a cigarette. Now that they're gone, I don't even miss them. It's been a week
    and a half, and the cravings are still nonexistent.

    The war on drugs has claimed millions of lives over the last half century. But what about those who could have been saved? Tobacco causes six million deaths per year. For a good portion
    of those, one tiny, highly illegal mushroom might contain the cure.

    -Charlie Gilmour



    The Beatles Tomorrow Never Knows


    Gordon McGlothlin is 65 years old and, until recently, he smoked 20 cigarettes a day, a habit he formed when just 15 years old. He tried to stop, using nicotine replacement therapy, psychological therapy, and going cold turkey. But each time he relapsed. Then, McGlothlin?s friend told him about an advertisement for participants in a clinical trial of a new treatment for tobacco addiction. So one December morning, McGlothlin walked into the research center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, where he took a small, blue capsule and sat in a room listening to classical music. The idea was that after he walked out of the research center in the evening he would never smoke another cigarette again. That was almost two years ago and McGlothlin says he is still smoke-free.

    McGlothlin was part of a small, proof-of-concept trial using psilocybin to help heavy smokers quit. Psilocybin is showing promise as a therapeutic agent for a number of psychiatric illnesses including addiction, depression and anxiety. ?I think psilocybin gave me the impetus to stay abstinent. It opens up a whole new dimension to your personality. It's almost as though quitting smoking is peripheral during the experience,? says McGlothlin. Because of his treatment with psilocybin, he feels freed from the hold that cigarettes had over him. ?It became non-important, like who cares?? He adds that the experience affected much more than just his addiction to tobacco. ?Psilocybin changed my life. It?s not that I was afraid of dying, but during the experience you come to grips with the fact that life is transient and death a continuation of that process, but that your thoughts persist,? he recalls. ?I had a friend dying of cancer and I think it would have been good for them, it gives tremendous piece of mind, it puts life and death in the right place, it gives you hope.?

    -Janna Lawrence

    -----

    One of my goals for the trip was to quit smoking, something I have tried to do many times using many methods, including an 8 day stay at a vegan retreat, after which I immediately began smoking again. Iboga gave me the space I needed to stop smoking. I still wanted to smoke after it was over, and it wasn?t exactly easy not to, but it also wasn?t hard. I could feel that the iboga had broken the addiction, and there was no longer that crazy, uncontrollable impulse in me that would override all rational attempts to not smoke.

    It has been 4 weeks since I quit, and there is no question in my mind that I will not smoke again, and the ceremony has likely extended my life. I honestly don?t know how else I would have quit. The situation was getting pretty desperate. Ultimately, participating in the ceremony was the right thing for me to do.

    Julie





    I started smoking when I was 17, and by the time I was 18, I was up to a pack a day. I smoked at least a pack a day until I was 25. Around that time I started really wanting to quit. I went on
    a two week vacation and was able to stop smoking during it. I started smoking again roughly a year later and kept smoking for over a year. Falling back into the nicotine addiction left me feeling defeated. New Years Eve that year I took 300ug of LSD with a resolution to quit smoking. That night I thought a lot about quitting, and when I woke up I felt I was actually capable of quitting for good. I just woke up not addicted to cigarettes, and it's been almost 2.5 years now.

    Something about wanting to stop combined with the LSD and spending that time pondering my addiction really did something different inside my brain.

    -argonargon

    -----

    I started on a daily regime dose of 50mg of iboga hcl 17 days ago, and in the first 3-4 days, my nicotine habit went down to nearly zero. In retrospect, I could have kicked with the minimum of effort. I didn't, which is more about my individual psychology/pathology than the efficiency of ibogaine in interrupting nicotine dependency.

    It seems that with high doses, a "window of opportunity" opens up and its up to the individual as always if they want to kick their chemical dependency. (After the 4th day, the effect seemed to diminish or at least get over written by continuing to smoke.

    HOWEVER!

    My nicotine habit is at least 50% down daily as of today (from 12.5g of rolling tobacco to below 6.5g), and this is the first time I've ever tried to kick nicotine, apart from a few times in the cells where there wasn't much choice.

    http://www.mindvox.com/pipermail/ibo...il/004292.html



    Jefferson Airplane Embryonic Journey


    LSD helped me quit smoking

    By Thijs Roes

    For 18 years I was a stubbornly addicted smoker, but I didn't break out of the bad habit until I took a tab of acid with my friend and realized how badly I wanted to leave cigarettes behind.

    For 18 years I was a light yet stubbornly addicted smoker. Perhaps my habit was a result of growing up with a Dutch mom who handed me wisdom like: Thijs, youre 11 now. Its time for you
    to learn how to roll smokes for your mommy.
    There were periods where Id just smoke one cigarette a day, and there were times when a pack wouldnt see me through. But quitting, really quitting, was something I found I was able to manage for a week at most.

    Earlier this year, I reached a few conclusions that seem completely obvious, but are still the kind of truths that addicts love to ignore:

    - Smoking is a boring, useless addiction. The only joy in smoking is giving in to the addiction.

    - There is only one moment out of billions of years of history in which I?m alive. What a waste to shorten that blip of time with something so boring.

    - Going out with friends can be fun, but if we all went out for shots of apple juice instead, I?d be just as content. Smoking is more like a random compulsive activity than an
    actual experience.

    Those thoughts started running through my head earlier this year, and went on for about a month. In the end, it was almost like something broke inside of me. I realized that smoking now filled me with self-hatred, and that realization came during a weekend binge on LSD.

    It's always fun, LSD. It may have become slightly out of fashion since the 1960s, but I have always regarded it as a milder version of taking mushrooms?albeit a longer-lasting trip. The fear and panic surrounding it always seemed excessive to me, but of course everyone who takes it has a different experience.

    As I was gazing up at the stars during that trippy night in spring, my best friend and I were talking about life and the three smokers' truths I mentioned above. I realized I had carried them with me for a while now, without ever making a disciplined decision.

    I can?t describe it in any other way than feeling as if a switch were flipped inside me. Suddenly, I realized how ridiculous smoking was?why was I doing something that made me feel miserable? Of course I was completely spaced out, but the psychedelics helped me zoom out and break through my own frozen ideas about not being able to quit. I didnt think, Yeah, yeah, yeah, I really need to quit soon. The only thought I had was: I don?t want to do this anymore.

    "Sounds like a familiar story," says clinical psychologist Pal-Orjan Johansen. Together with his wife Teri S. Krebs, Johansen has been conducting research into psychedelics and alcohol addiction as part of a research fellowship at Harvard Medical School. "We've heard of addictions to alcohol, heroin, and tobacco that were broken with help from psychedelics. The reason seems to be that substances like LSD can provide a moment of clarity that can help you see your existence as a whole and get a long-term perspective into certain personal issues.?

    Research into the medical application of substances like LSD and psilocybin (the active ingredient in psychedelic mushrooms) are still in their very early phases. The 1950s and 1960s are remembered as a golden age of scientific research into psychedelics, but that doesn't mean it wasn't problematic. Some trials weren't big enough to prove anything in particular, other experiments (carried out by the CIA) were horrifically unethical, and once the drug became illegal in the mid 60s it never fully recovered from the cultural backlash that ensued.

    Research efforts have expanded in the last few years, but scientific psychedelic inquiry is still pretty small-scale. "There are three clinical research projects in the United States right now,
    and several more are being prepared,"
    says Johansen.

    Right after I published a version of this story on VICE in the Netherlands last month, the results of the worlds first research into smoking and psychedelics came out. Out of 15 heavy smokers who took part in the study, 12 remained smoke-free after six months of psychotherapy aided with psilocybin.

    Krebs and Johansen found similar conclusions after their analysis of randomized controlled trials of LSD for alcoholism. Those who had taken a full dose of LSD, Krebs says, were twice as likely to decrease their alcohol consumption or remain abstinent, as compared with subjects who took a low dose of LSD or a placebo.

    I count myself as a success story, too. In the days that followed my LSD trip, I could feel my body craving nicotine, but there was nothing in my mind telling me to give into that feeling. I treated it like a mosquito bite: Just wait till it's over and it won?t bother you again.

    About two months later, Argentina kicked Holland out of the World Cup. If there was ever a moment to start smoking again, that was it. I wanted to test myself and see if I had really broken my addiction, so I grabbed my friend?s cigarette, took a drag, and couldnt imagine there was ever a moment that I had enjoyed smoking.

    People shouldn't think they can just drop acid once and expect that it will solve any illness or addiction they have, of course. It just so happened that I had an experience with psychedelics in which I tried to figure out why I had been smoking for such a long time, and I'm generally the type of person who enjoys psychoanalyzing myself.

    It's hard work to quit after years of alcoholism or smoking, says Johansen. Our opinion is that patients will need to have several doses of psychedelics in combination with treatment. It is no magic tool, but it can act as a catalyst for epiphanies and can make you ask questions like, If not now, when???

    I don't think I would have ever been able to quit smoking without that hit of LSD. I'd tried giving up in the past, but my lack of self-discipline always stood in the way. Some people say drug use is something that shouldnt be promoted, but Im still waiting for the person who will explain to me why I should be ashamed for my experience. Im extremely happy that I?m done with smoking. And who knows? Maybe my next dose of acid will finally send me to the gym.


    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 03:56.
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    Blue Cheer Feathers From Your Tree


    CBD oil can help you quit smoking cigarettes

    By Roman Sukharenko

    First, I am not suggesting that you should start smoking “pot” to quit tobacco. CBD is a specific substance from cannabis which is responsible for giving you all the positive health benefits of consuming cannabis but without the mind-altering effects of THC, the other substance in cannabis which gets you high.

    Second, smoking in general is bad for you not because tobacco is toxic but because our lungs are not made to deal with smoking. When a cigarette is burned, the temperature at which the smoke is released makes it very hot for it to be absorbed by our lungs, resulting in a stressful situation for these vital organs and our whole bodies. In time, the lungs (and their native defense mechanisms) are hurt and that is why smoking is associated with higher risks of developing chronic health issues.

    What if you could avoid both of these situations and make the most of them? Best of all, what if you could use these situations to help you quit smoking and improve your health in tremendous ways using CBD oil?

    A recent study came out showing that CBD cannabis oil can be an efficient aid in quitting smoking. The researchers at the University College London have published an article in the “Addictive Behaviors” journal which found that the non-psychoactive chemical in cannabis could reduce the number of cigarettes consumed by smokers who wanted to quit.

    Here’s the tricky part – the CBD oil was consumed by the participants in this study via an inhaler, which means that in some way they still “smoked” it. But what is the difference, then?

    The difference is that when you consume CBD oil with a vaporizer, the temperature at which the oil is burned is much lower than if you were to burn some plants and smoke them. That way, you get the best out of both worlds – you can still continue smoking (although the habit should be dropped after you have overcome the nicotine addiction) while also lowering your addiction towards cigarettes and improving your health in many other ways as well (just research the applications of CBD oil in numerous health issues and you will understand what I am talking about).

    Previous research has indeed shown that CBD can help with a variety of drug additions but this particular study was the first to investigate the specific effects of CBD on cigarette addiction in humans.

    In this study, twenty four smokers have been recruited and were split into two groups, one receiving inhalers containing CBD and the other ones containing a placebo. Both groups were told to use the inhalers whenever they felt the urge to smoke for a period of 7 days.

    The study found that while the placebo group showed no difference in their smoking habits, the group which received CBD oil in their inhalers have reduced the number of cigarettes they smoked by 40% on average. (which is a very significant statistic)

    Dr. Morgan, one of the researchers in this study, added that CBD might mean these positive smoking memories are gradually erased.

    Although various treatments for cigarette addiction are available, researchers are still searching for more effective alternatives. CBD oil seems to be a promising candidate due to this study and some recent others. However, Dr. Morgan says it is hard to draw a direct comparison with other therapies based just on the results of her study.
    She also adds that This was more than expected. However, it is difficult to compare to other smoking cessation therapies as we did not ask people to stop smoking, simply to try using the inhaler when they wanted a cigarette.

    Obviously, this is a great psychological benefit for those who are seeking to quit smoking as the physiological pattern is quite strong in smokers, especially in stressful or social situations.

    So how can you use this information? Well, first keep in mind that it is not the plants per se which are harmful to us but the process of burning them at high temperatures.

    Second, you can replace this situation by using a vaporizer, which is much more healthy because the temperature at which the oils are burned is much lower, hence it will provoke less damage to the lungs.

    Third, if you want to quicken your progress in quitting smoking cigarettes then try CBD oil – which will also be of great benefit for your health in numerous ways.

    Since the study we talked about was released, others have been carried as well proving that indeed CBD oil is a great aid in quitting smoking.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 19:25.
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    20-06-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by PsychaStevic View Post
    A medium dose of LSD and a coughing fit is what made me kick my nasty pack a day habit, cold turkey too!
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    The Byrds Eight Miles High


    Psilocybin for nicotine addiction

    Smoking causes half a million deaths in the U.S. each year and is related to annual health care expenditures of $170 billion. Overcoming nicotine addiction poses a real challenge to smokers. Smoking cessation programs such as the popular Quit for Life program achieve abstinence rates of only 17.2% at six months. If supported with medication and weekly counseling meetings,
    the success rate can rise to 35 percent, dependent on the medication used.21 The highest success rates were seen in programs containing extensive cognitive-behavioral therapy, plus pharmaceuticals, plus nicotine replacements. Such comprehensive programs show abstinence rates of 45 to 59 percent at six months.

    Matthew Johnson, expert in drug dependence at Johns Hopkins, wanted to see if psilocybin could help smokers to quit their addiction. In an open-label pilot study, 15 nicotine-dependent smokers were guided through a 15-week smoking cessation protocol which provided high levels of psychological support, but no pharmaceuticals or nicotine replacements. The participants had smoked on average 19 cigarettes per day for 31 years and had attempted to quit smoking six times before. After the program, which included up to three psilocybin sessions, 80 percent of the participants were smoke free at the six-month mark.

    At 12 months after the quitting date, 67 percent of participants were smoke free, and 87 percent rated their psilocybin sessions amongst the five most personally meaningful and spiritually significant experiences of their lives. Even at around 2.5 years after the quitting date, a solid 60 percent of study participants remained smoke-free.

    The numbers produced by these three studies are impressive to say the least. Equally impressive is hearing what the participants have to say about these treatment experiences.

    https://www.psymposia.com/magazine/p...mental-health/
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 03:27.
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    The Doors When The Music's Over


    How DMT helped me quit my cigarette addiction

    This is my story of how DMT helped me quit a 6 year smoking habit, which I had tried many times to get rid of with no success.

    I started my first year of University studying Medicinal Chemistry and during my first year I started smoking, drinking, partying and living the Student life. It was the funnest, most event filled year of my life.

    The smoking habit gradually picked up momentum and by my final year I was smoking around 20 cigarettes a day. I finished University and went back again to study Economics and was accepted at a Technological University in Singapore for my 2nd year. This was an extremely stressful year for me and I found myself smoking close to 40 a day! It was insane.

    Once I returned to London from Singapore, I decided to quit. I tried everything, patches, hypnotherapy, going cold turkey, meditation, electric cigarettes, you name it! Nothing worked, I found myself always going back, especially on nights out where I would drink alcohol. There was no end to it.

    I began coughing a lot, had problems breathing, it was really becoming a health concern for me. This went on for another year, until one night I came across DMT.

    After having researched DMT for over 2 years, I finally got my hands on some. I loaded the pipe, picked up the lighter and inhaled. I held the smoke in for about 8 seconds, exhaled and took a 2nd hit. At this point I don’t actually remember how long I kept the smoke in. As I inhaled, I felt like I was sinking in to the fabric of time and everything around me began to speed up. I had completely lost any interest in whether I was breathing or not, I was gasping at the beautiful geometric shapes that were coming at me
    from all directions.

    I stared at amazement at the beautiful colors emanating from my fingertips like laser beams, colors that I have no names for. After a while I began to hear a buzzing sound coming at me from behind me. The sound got closer and closer and my surroundings began to dissipate in to darkness, everything broke apart like a computer simulation and dissolved in to nothingness! I was left in darkness with a high pitch sound getting closer and closer to the center of my head from what felt like miles away.

    The sound finally reached the centre of my head and instantly I was thrown in to pure silence. No visuals, no sounds, no sensations, no connections to the real world, no worries, just pure existence. It was the most beautiful experience of my life, I can only describe it as being the ultimate oneness of creation.

    After what felt like eternity I began to see a ghostly figure approach me. She was made out of light and had no immediate features that I can put in to words, I just ‘knew’ she was a Female Goddess of some sort. She came close to me and almost sat on my chest and whispered “You are ill. You need help”.

    When I came back it had faded like a dream. But after she spoke those words, I got the feeling she was healing me, my body felt almost cool and I don’t remember much more.
    I remember opening my eyes and being in shock. I couldn’t believe what I had seen, I checked my heart and was happy to find my heart rate was normal and beating just fine.

    My first instinct was to reach for a cigarette. I took out a Marlborough Light, put it to my lips and lit it. I hadn’t even inhaled when I gagged violently and began coughing up flew. I took a drink of water and suddenly the smoke from the cigarette hit my nose. I felt completely ill to my stomach, I don’t have the words to describe how disgusted I felt. I put it out straight away.

    A couple of days passed and I realized I hadn’t smoked a single cigarette. It had not occurred to me at any point that there was something strange going on. I merely ‘forgot’ to smoke!

    2 days became 1 week, became 1 month, became 1 year and now its been almost 3 years, I haven’t touched a single cigarette. Even when I drink, I have zero cravings. Even the thought of it makes me sick.

    Its an amazing experience for me, it goes to show that there is so much out there we know nothing about. Whether you believe it was a coincidence (!) or that the entity was a figment of my own imagination or Goddess from the 6th Dimension, it makes no difference. The bottom line is that substances such as DMT have the power to heal. How it does it can be something we can find out through research and scientific analysis.

    -TripTamine
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    LSD helped me quit smoking

    Last Saturday I decided to trip on LSD for the first time. I've tried quitting smoking before but always gone back to it after a couple of days. When I decided to trip I had no intentions of quitting smoking, but while peaking I looked at my pack and noticed that I had only one cigarette left. I've read about LSD helping people overcome addictions, so me, being at the peak of
    an LSD trip I figured I'd smoke that cigarette like it was my last one.

    If you've ever smoked a cigarette on LSD I think you'll understand what I mean when I say it feels very weird. Just putting a cigarette to my mouth and inhaling felt so alien. So while I was sitting on my balcony smoking this cigarette I just realized how fucking stupid cigarettes are and how brainwashed I was to even continue buying them. So while smoking this last cigarette I just realized how nasty they really are. Don't get me wrong, I've known they are for a long time, but something about the acid just helped me truly understand it.

    So while smoking the cigarette I just looked around, everything was so beautiful, the water was flowing so smoothly, the birds flying together forming shapes in the sky. I just realized I don't want to continue smoking, I don't want to die from cancer.

    So today (four days later) I met my friend who tripped for the first time in his life earlier today. I noticed he had a cigarette he was about to smoke, so I asked him if I could get half of it just to see what it was like to smoke. Neither of us liked it at all and I'm now convinced I will never smoke cigarettes again.

    -Dazeldo

    -----

    Same thing happened to me in August! I grabbed a smoke while I was peaking on LSD and for whatever reason it just occurred to me how fucked up it was. Similar to what you experienced.
    I didn't smoke for the rest of the trip and after that I quit cold turkey. I was smoking a pack every two days before that trip, and now I'm just over seven months cigarette-free.

    -Psychedelicized

    -----

    Psilocybin provides a whole other perspective from which to view your psyche and your life. It can be a kind of apotheosis that lasts for months beyond the actual trip. I took mushrooms ten years ago to quit cigarettes and was completely successful in the attempt – that’s a powerful reason to give this a chance.

    -Tony Spencer
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    27-06-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by vortech View Post
    I noticed psychedelics and dissociatives both make one realize the stark reality of a chemical lie, one that does not benefit the body in any amount that addicts smoke. First time after tripping on mushrooms
    I threw away the cigarettes I had without a second thought and managed to stay off them for awhile. A couple weeks ago after an LSD trip I smoked my first cigarette since before the trip and felt the negative effects on the body super clearly. Most of the last 10 years or so I have limited to 3-4 cigarettes a day with periods of abstinence, but I will admit during my opioid addiction (and when drinking alcohol) I smoked more. I attribute psychedelics and dissociatives for keeping my use of tobacco in check. It seems fitting that the 'dark' physically addicting drugs are the ones that encourage smoking, and the non psychically-addicting drugs discourage.
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    28-06-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by mr peabody View Post
    Great comment. Psychedelics seem to have an intrinsic power to expose lies. That may well be their most important attribute, to reveal truth in the face of deception.
    Great comment. Psychedelics seem to have an intrinsic power to expose lies. That may well be their greatest attribute, to reveal truth in the face of deception.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 03:16.
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    29-06-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by tokezu View Post
    ^Yes, absolutely! I had a trip on 2C-E once where it became apparent to me that I didn't really like smoking anymore and hadn't liked it for quite some time, but somehow I had managed to keep that feeling totally hidden from myself, because I was too scared of trying to quit and possibly fail. And as every procrastinator knows, the only way to make sure you can't fail is not to try at all, right? Not really what I had in mind for that trip, just wanted to have some fun not some revelation like that, but that's how it goes sometimes, right? I didn't stop right after that either, but after the trip I just couldn't shake the thought anymore and became more and more aware that even that glorified cigarette with the morning coffee or after a good meal wasn't really that good anymore. When I finally quit months later, it was the easiest thing I ever did. Over three years now and I haven't missed it for a second.
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    The Jimi Hendrix Experience 1983... (A Merman I Should Turn to Be)


    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 04:38.
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    An eye-opening trip on mushrooms could help you quit smoking

    By Quentin Stuckey

    The realization and medical research on the adverse effects of smoking in the 1960s gave birth to a new type of health industry. The media created a dramatic shift in cultural attitude when people were no longer being encouraged to smoke cigarettes, but rather to quit tobacco once and for all. This is a booming industry to this very day.

    For some people going cold turkey and never igniting a cigarette ever again is an effective method for quitting but for many others it isn’t as simple as that. Smokers will chew gum designed
    to fulfill the nicotine craving, inhale vapor with e-cigarettes or use nicotine patches - any possible method to help them kick their unhealthy addiction. There may be a more unconventional approach to quit smoking that was never previously thought of, which involves the use of psychedelic drugs.

    In an article published in the Science of Us section of New York Magazine, medical research was conducted by The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse to determine whether the psychedelic drug psilocybin (aka magic mushrooms) could help people quit smoking. Psilocybin is primarily known for its powerful mind-altering effects which include distortion of senses, euphoria, hallucinations, possible anxiety, disorientation and changes in patterns of thinking as defined by the government of Canada's health section.

    The study took fifteen middle-aged smokers and conducted a fifteen week cognitive behavioral therapy training course. During the course, the participants learned different psychological techniques to improve the quality of their thoughts. It was during the fifth week that the smokers were given a moderate dose of psilocybin, which was then followed by a high dose during
    the seventh week. The participants were then given the option of taking a third dose during the thirteenth week.

    One year after the study was completed, the researchers discovered that ten out of the fifteen participants had stopped smoking tobacco as confirmed by a drug test. Thirty months later the researchers performed further drug tests and discovered that nine out of the ten smoke free participants were still abstaining from smoking. According to the publication, the data adds up to a sixty percent success rate of quitting.

    The participants in the study described their psychedelic trip as spiritually significant with thirteen of the participants ranking the experience as one of their top five most personally meaningful. This comes as no surprise as psychedelic trips often rewire the brain to seek out more meaningful connections and higher principles, according to psychiatrist Matthew W. Johnson, lead author of the study.

    The researchers however feel that the results are not as clear cut as they appear. They are in the midst of another trial which will compare the quitting rate with the use of psilocybin compared to the nicotine patch, while also using the cognitive behavioral therapy course used in the first study. The team is also reportedly utilizing the technology of MRI scanning to determine the physical changes that occur in the brain before and after the study.

    The possibility of psychedelic drugs helping people quit smoking does not reside in the physical or chemical compounds of the substances themselves but rather in the mental effects on the user. People re-evaluate their life choices and the very fabric of their being while under the influence of psychotropic drugs, which could discourage impulse and pleasure seeking behaviors like smoking cigarettes. One thing is certain: naturally occurring, consciousness altering drugs are the better alternative to over the counter, government regulated meds when it comes to giving up an addictive vice like smoking.
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    Ride Here and Now


    Psilocybin ended my cigarette addiction


    By Ron Cassie

    Dan Kreitman, a 55-year-old upholsterer and smoker for nearly 40 years, is one of the Hopkins’ psychedelic studies living proofs. Grabbing a chair in his workshop in his Baltimore County
    garage, the gregarious Kreitman recounts his psilocybin sessions that were a part of the smoking cessation trials. “Three years later, I’m totally amazed by it,” he says, taking a break on a warm Saturday afternoon. “Bringing it up, I remember how good it was—and all the positive feelings come right back. I’m going to warn you,” adds Kreitman. “When I talk about it, I can get emotional.”

    Kreitman not only wanted to quit smoking for years without success, he’d become ashamed of his habit—sneaking cigarettes when his son, daughter, and wife weren’t around. Given his age, that he didn’t eat great and was overweight, his family was also pressing him to quit. “It was my son, who was 18 then, who heard about the Hopkins’s studies and told me.” As part of his preparation, Kreitman was asked to keep a smoking diary—writing down the times of day when he picked up a cigarette. He also went through about six to eight counseling sessions, which included guided meditation exercises in the run-up before receiving his “magic” blue capsules of psilocybin.

    Kreitman actually took three capsules of psilocybin in three separate sessions, in progressively stronger doses, he believes. The first session was very positive. “My father had recently committed suicide, but no demons or dragons,” he says. “Happy thoughts.”

    The second experience was more of everything. “More vivid colors, more crazy shapes.” More happy thoughts.

    “The third session, I left Earth and saw infinity,” Kreitman says. “It was so intense, so holy, I don’t know how to talk about it. A lot of stars, planets, the cosmos. It was so colorful
    and beautiful—I’m still blown away.


    “And I saw my dad,” he continues. “He was in a boat floating down a river and he smiled and waved. I also saw an image of an old rabbi, somebody who looked like the God of the Old Testament with the white beard—the image of God I grew up with—steering the boat.”

    The overwhelming feeling, Kreitman says, was of going out into the universe, and he wasn’t sure if he’d be coming back or not. “It didn’t matter,” he says, wiping the corner of his eye. “Everything was okay.”

    Smokers are considered good test cases in terms of addiction because their lives are often less chaotic and they have suffered fewer acute consequences than say, a heroin addict, says
    Matt Johnson, a Johns Hopkins associate professor of psychiatry and lead author of the smoking cessation study. Nonetheless, adds Johnson, cigarette addiction and dependence on other substances usually involves more than physical cravings. There’s a social dynamic when two or more smokers gather. There’s also a repetitive ritualistic component that can serve as an emotional crutch throughout the day.

    Both addiction and depression create a sort of self-perpetuating tunneling of the brain’s default mode—a downward spiraling in thinking patterns and behavior—that only burrows over time. Psilocybin, on the other hand, Johnson says, generates “a whole lot more cross-talk across the brain,” which can have the effect of breaking apart these tunnels and dramatically shifting a subject’s perspective.

    “All of a sudden people go from talking about the strange colors they’re seeing to talking about communion with a higher power, who some call God.
    It’s this insight they experience that provides a new, ‘big picture.’ It becomes a spiritual guidepost and stays with them. They realize, ‘I’m a miracle. I can quit smoking,’” says Johnson.

    Kreitman describes himself today as more in rhythm with people and the world around him. “If I’m getting off the train and someone drops something,” he says, “it’s like I’m immediately
    aware this person needs help and I’m bending over to help them.”


    He’s also eating better and has lost 15-20 pounds. He’s down to about 180 pounds now on his 5-foot-7 frame. “But I still grab some fried chicken on the weekend when I get a chance,”
    he chuckles. He’s also going to synagogue more, but adds with a smile that it might be because his cousin who goes regularly lives closer to him than in the past.

    He says that he used to picture himself at 70, sitting on the porch with emphysema—a can of beer in hand. “Now, a whole new chapter of my life has opened up that I never expected,” Kreitman says. “Is that a religious experience? If not, I don’t know what is.”

    As far as the smoking goes, he put out his last Camel on the way to the Bayview clinic before his final psilocybin session. “I don’t feel like an ex-smoker, I feel like a non-smoker—like I was never a smoker. My wife and I will be outside Giant or someplace and we’ll walk past employees out front smoking and I’ll catch myself saying to her, ‘They shouldn’t let people stand near
    the doors and smoke like that.’"


    “She just laughs at me.”
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    10-07-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by stoned.crazy View Post
    I noticed this on mushrooms and lsd. Especially mushrooms. That was one of the most prominent effects I noticed the first times I tried shrooms. I tried smoking a cigarette and it just tasted disgusting.
    Couldn't smoke cigs for a couple days which was great.

    Stopping smoking with lsd is different for me though. On LSD I just feel completely in control of every thought and action I have and do. I end up improving every aspect of myself that I feel could be better.
    I try to cut out any aspects of my personality that have any sort of negative impact on anything. I mean everything down to trying not to even step on any ants or plants while i walk lol.

    Eventually I end up falling back into my old habits if I don't make enough changes though, but LSD gives me a period of time where I feel as though I can make any changes I want to in my life.

    I think part of what lsd does to my mind is centers me in the moment. The past is already over and the future is based on choices that I make now. That's where I think a lot of my strength to make positive changes comes from in regards to lsd.

    Great topic mr peabody.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 03:14.
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    Pink Floyd Obscured By Clouds


    It wasn't the reason I was taking ayahuasca, but after 9 months of using it weekly, I started asking myself what, if anything, cigarettes did for me. I couldn't think of a single thing, so
    I just decided not to buy any more. No cravings, no withdrawal symptoms. I completely rid myself of the stranglehold cigarettes had over me, all thanks to ayahuasca. I'd been smoking
    daily for 6 years.

    Bottom line, yes you have to want to quit, but you also need to analyze just what tobacco does for you. I just got to thinking that cigarette addiction is really just a "mental" addiction, because it's your mind that thinks you need cigarettes, not your body. If you can regain control over the mind, psychedelics can break you out of the addiction cycle by refreshing your
    mental state, then all that's really left is intention, the intention to quit.

    -Sabnock

    -----

    One night my friend and I took LSD. About four hours into the trip I reached for a cigarette. I walked outside to smoke it, and about halfway through I started hearing voices. They told
    me to stop smoking, that what I was doing was shameful, that I shouldn't do it. I threw the rest away and never had any more cravings. LSD is a miraculous chemical.

    -PlaySkool
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    Pepperland


    Kathleen Conneally smoked since she was 12, but one day in the spring of 2013, that changed. Conneally was a participant in an addiction study conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University, who wanted to determine whether the relentless pull of nicotine could be weakened by another drug: psilocybin—the active compound in magic mushrooms.

    Conneally’s trip, the second in a series of three such “sessions,” was probably the best outcome the researchers could have hoped for. She saw herself as purple flower rising high above her earthly problems, which looked small and stupid by comparison. Even more measly and insignificant was an image of herself, huddled and puffing on a cigarette.

    “Just breathe, and there’s no smoke, and no chemicals, and no problems,” she recalled herself thinking.

    Leaving the lab 5 hours later, she was sure she would never smoke again. Before, the stress of her life would stir an overwhelming desire for cigarettes. But now, she said, “I can just cross
    that off my list. I don’t have to do it anymore.”
    She hasn’t had a cigarette in more than three years.

    -Olga Khazan

    -----

    Dr. Brian Rush, an addiction researcher first heard of ayahuasca in 2011 and decided to travel to Peru to learn more. He checked into an ayahuasca center, where he confronted his 20-year addiction to nicotine.

    "I was laid flat-out in a coffin, and my three children were standing around me," Rush says. "Then I started purging, and it felt like I was purging the tobacco poison."

    Not long after Rush returned home, he gave up smoking for good.

    "I had quit before, but this time was different," he says. "It's like I have no memory of smoking. That was a year and a half ago, and I haven't had a cigarette."

    -Olivia LaVecchia
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    Jimi Hendrix and the Band of Gypsys Message To Love


    If you overuse a psychedelic, it will turn on you and won't let you get comfortable in your abuse—the main reason they are so effective in helping people kick their habits to alcohol and other addictive drugs. They let you see beyond the delusions your brain feeds you to keep you abusing whatever drug you're addicted to. I quit smoking cigarettes, quit benzos and no longer binge drink, all thanks to psychedelics taking the blinders off of me.

    -Hecklelig

    -----

    I’ve personally used a microdosing regiment to quit smoking cigarettes. I first heard about the merits of microdosing from Dr. Fadiman’s book, tried it on myself, and it was wildly successful. My regiment lasted two weeks total. I knew that smoking was bad and that it was killing me slowly (this is an important aspect for microdosing to be successful) and I knew I wanted to quit. Two weeks was all it took. It’s now been roughly two years since that time, and I'm not only a non-smoker, but I have never once had a craving for a cigarette.

    -Matthew Landis
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    Cream Those Were The Days


    Data suggest psychedelics such as psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of addictions, including tobacco dependence. This retrospective cross-sectional anonymous online survey characterized 358 individuals (52 females) who reported having quit or reduced smoking after ingesting a psychedelic in a non-laboratory setting ⩾1 year ago. On average, participants smoked 14 cigarettes/day for 8 years, and had five previous quit attempts before their psychedelic experience. Of the 358 participants, 38% reported continuous smoking cessation after psychedelic use (quitters). Among quitters, 74% reported >2 years’ abstinence.

    -Journal of Psychopharmacology

    -----

    Microdosing mushrooms has helped me quit smoking. The days that I would microdose would feel 100 times easier to ignore cigarette cravings. It would feel like I was already satisfied and did not need to reach for smokes for any reason.

    -mackraslo

    -----

    It's been over a month now, so I feel confident enough to say that there will be no more smoke in my lungs. Day 3 of starting to microdose, and I just knew it was going to be the day. I just stopped. Done.

    -anon

    -----

    I took 0.25 grams of psilocybin once every 3 days for 2 months with no negative side effects. I am now 3 months free of nicotine and still have no urge to smoke even around heavy smokers.

    -squidster42
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    Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds


    Smoking DMT made me quit smoking cigarettes. DMT is a truly amazing, very spiritual journey — not something to do simply to try. You have to be fully ready and accepting of this gift.
    Once you try DMT you'll see the whole world in a different light, in a positive and vibrant way.

    -snerpyflurpy

    -----

    After my first DMT breakthrough I came out knowing I would never smoke again, and in nearly 2 years I haven't even wanted a cigarette.

    -Trip Tamine

    -----

    Before taking Ibogaine I was sitting around waiting and smoking cigarettes. Finally the doctor said, 'Yeah, we can do it in the morning.' Then I realized I had only 3 cigarettes left, so I said, 'I've been told Ibogaine takes 36-48 hours. I'm not about to sit here for 36 hours without cigarettes.'

    Somebody had to go out for me in the middle of the night to get me a pack of Camels. Then I took the Ibogaine, and the whole time I didn't smoke. I haven't had a cigarette since.

    -Paul De Rienzo
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    Ann and Sasha Shulgin


    I was a smoker addicted to nicotine for 37 years. Ten years ago, I planned a magic mushroom trip that changed my life. I potentiated the psilocybin with a Syrian Rue seed extract.
    I quit smoking as a result and I have never looked back, except to thank the mushrooms that made my liberation possible.

    -Tony Spencer

    -----

    Recently in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, our research team published the worlds first scientific study of a psychedelic in the treatment of tobacco addiction. Specifically, we used psilocybin as the medicine. Psilocybin exerts its primary effects by activating the serotonin 2A receptor in the brain. The point of the study was to establish safety and determine whether
    the intervention showed effects promising enough to warrant a larger controlled trial.

    This open-label study (meaning, participants knew they were getting the drug on session days) integrated 2 or 3 moderate-to-high dose psilocybin sessions with a cognitive behavioral therapy program, which is the general orientation of most smoking cessation programs. The participants, 15 smokers who smoked about a pack a day, had been smoking an average of over 30 years, and had attempted to quit smoking on multiple previous occasions. We found no clinically significant unexpected adverse events in the study, and found that 80% of participants were biologically verified as smoke free at a 6-month follow-up visit.

    -Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D.
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    Quitting cigarettes may be harder than quitting heroin


    By Candy Lashkari

    It may be tougher to quit smoking cigarettes compared to beating a heroin addiction. An Australian study found that many long term smokers have tried to quit 7.4 times but are still unable
    to do so. Sydney GP Raymond Seidler actually feels that people do not realize that quitting smoking is just as bad as kicking heroin out of your life.

    "What smokers don't realise is that nicotine addiction is as powerful, or even more powerful, than heroin addiction," he said. "The brain's receptors for smoking are as strongly attached to nicotine as the heroine receptor is to opiates. That can come as a shock to a lot of people. Quitting is therefore a serious challenge for most." said Dr Seidler.

    A recent survey commissioned by Pfizer Australia, a pharmaceutical company, had responses from over 2,000 smokers which revealed that smokers are much more likely to find chores to do rather than approach a health care professional to help them kick the butt. Amongst the respondents 35% would rather clean the house, 27% would rather pay the bills, 22% would rather go
    to work on the weekend and 18% would rather go to dinner with the in-laws to avoid visiting a health care professional.

    "We need to address the issues of why people are reluctant to go to a professional to get help, because we know that GPs and pharmacists have an important role to play in supporting patients who want to quit smoking," said Dr Seidler.

    In the survey it was found that 28% were unsure of how the health care professional could help them quit smoking cigarettes. The smokers in New South Wales were the least likely to seek help from experts. 75% of all the respondents had made at least 2 attempts at quitting and been unsuccessful. According to Dr Seidler if more people approached experts they would be able
    to give up smoking with a greater success rate.

    "The benefits to smokers of seeking professional help perhaps need to be more carefully and persuasively explained." said Dr Seidler.

    In the survey 27% did not want to spend the money on seeking professional help from the experts while 17% were worried about being judged. 16% were unable to admit that they have tried to quit and failed, while 12% say that they do have the time to seek professional help. Amongst the respondents 6% even said that their own doctors were unaware that they smoked.
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    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    Sgt. Pepper


    I went to an Ibogaine center in Mexico for opiate addiction. It all sounded too good to be true, but before I did the treatment I was a smoker. After one treatment and one day to recover, I couldn't have cared less about a smoke. It works so well, that after seeing it for myself it made me angry that it remains illegal here in the US. It really is a miracle, and the fact that it isn't even an option here, shows that the government doesn't want to fix the pill problem we have here. If they put every addict into treatment on the same day, there would be no addicts left
    the next day, literally.

    -bryan weaver

    -----

    I consulted a friend who does work with ibogaine in mexico and asked him his recommended dose for smoking cessation - keep in mind we're both about 60kg, he said "120mg" no hesitation, so about 2mg/kg. I went home, weighed it out, looked at it skeptically, was hesitant, then took it. An hour later I could feel it washing over me, soothing away all the nicotine jitters. I am sitting here now 17 hours tobacco free with no anxiety at all. I'll be continuing the 120mg a day until I run out, which is to say today I am absolutely shocked at how well this has worked.

    -cdin

    -----

    The administration to a nicotine or tobacco addict of ibogaine, ibogamine or tabernanthine or non-toxic salts of those alkaloids, of the family apocynaceae, has been discovered to interrupt
    the physiological and psychological aspects of nicotine or tobacco dependency. A single treatment or series of treatments may be effective for one to eighteen months or longer. Treatment consists of the oral, rectal infusion or suppository administration of ibogaine, ibogamine, tabernanthine or their salts in dosage ranges of 1 mg/kg to 60 mg/kg.

    EXAMPLE 1

    Subject, age 42, was smoking two or more packs of filter cigarettes per day. Subject was administered a single dose of 15 mg/kg of ibogaine. Subject suffered no nicotine withdrawal and has not smoked cigarettes for more than 24 months, at which time tracking ceased.

    EXAMPLE 2

    Subject, age 34, Subject was smoking one and a half packs of filter cigarettes per day when administered 15 mg/kg of ibogaine HCl. Cigarette smoking continued, but diminished over a thirty day period at which time the subject ceased to smoke cigarettes.

    EXAMPLE 3

    Subject, a 36 year old male had been smoking four to six cigerettes a day for a year. A single treatment with 25 mg/kg of ibogaine interrupted all tobacco use. Subject has had no desire to continue smoking and suffered no discomfort of nicotine withdrawal.
    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 04:00.
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    I took 1/2 teaspoon per day of iboga root at home. I quit smoking without any withdrawal symptoms, and that was an addiction I had for 30 years.

    -Michelle

    -----

    Subject, age 43, was treated for cocaine dependency. Subject was additionally smoking two or more packs of filter cigarettes per day. Subject was administered a single dose of 15 mg/kg
    of ibogaine. Subject suffered no nicotine withdrawal and has not smoked cigarettes for more than 24 months.

    -----

    Subject, age 34, female was treated for heroin dependency and had a fourteen year history of heroin use. Subject was concurrently smoking one and a half packs of filter cigarettes per day. Acute interruption of heroin addiction was successfully completed with the administration of 15 mg/kg of ibogaine. Cigarette smoking continued, but diminished over a 30-day period at which time the subject ceased to smoke cigarettes.

    -sciencedirect.com

    -----

    I wasn’t expecting anything when I took ibogaine, but I found it cured me of smoking, and nicotine was definitely my drug of choice. I smoked for 35 years. I expected to die of lung cancer.
    I can’t tell you how surprised I was not to crave a cigarette. I was simply baffled.

    -Clare

    -----

    Just talked to friend who underwent Ibogaine treatment in Mexico. He did this because of heroin and cocaine use. His results were miraculous. Besides quitting heroin and cocaine, he ended a 25 yr smoking habit overnight. He said the “trip” was intense... somewhat comparable to 5-15 hits of the most powerful LSD. But different. He mentioned “touching the eternal” but was really unable to describe. I am on suboxone and thinking about taking treatment myself. It sounds incredible.

    -blahmfingblah


    Last edited by mr peabody; 16-06-2018 at 00:05.
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    Bluelighter mr peabody's Avatar
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    08-09-2017

    Quote Originally Posted by jezpe View Post
    I dont know if its because of shrooms, but they definitely helped me quit. Ive been wanting to quit for years. I was looking into switching over to e-cigs.
    But in my country (finland) theyre made illegal. So i was planning a ship ride to estonia and get me some vapor. Plan was to go about week after this trip i had. i Dosed good amount of shrooms and was tripping hard and thought why the hell am i planning some smuggle routes for e-cigs. Just quit. and i did. Next sunday bcomes 2 weeks since last cigarette and i can already smell and breathe alot better. First 3 days was bad after that it kinda slipped out of my mind. But the mental torture of wanting to smoke is pretty rough. These nicotine pills and gums help a little, but you still need willpower.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kittycat5 View Post
    I agree jezpe. You would also have to believe that psychedelics open you up to a different way of thinking for them to be effective. Not everyone believes that.
    Quote Originally Posted by jezpe View Post
    I feel every time i use psychedelics that now im thinking clearly without the usual money/time/school worries. Just feels you take an honest look into yourself and your life. And its great if you can grab something of those ideas in everyday life, but for me they always stay in the psychedelics realm , At least i managed to pick this great idea. Also i dont think you can "enlighten" or cure bad habits by doing drugs. Even when ive had some deeply spiritual experiences about We Are One and universal intelligence. But i think everytime you use psychedelics you come out slightly different person. Im just happy that i brought this one good idea with me
    Quote Originally Posted by jezpe View Post
    I wanted to add that now that i read little bit about ibogaine, i can see its potential "cure" not 100% ofc
    Quote Originally Posted by Haltia View Post
    I've been now nicotine-free for almost one and a half year and I don't even think about much about it. Before that I smoked a pack a day for about thirty years, tried many times to stop. MXE was one factor that helped me to quit. The other was willingness to take up daily meditation. Haven't kept up with that though, but I'm still involved with ACHs (O-PCE) but I sense that a detachment and abstaining is on its way too. The dance is about to change. I've also given up meat. Next one to go down, plastic.
    Quote Originally Posted by levels View Post
    Yeah, when I smoked I used to love smoking while on psychedelics. It was like the favor of the tobacco took on multidimensional flavors. When I quit smoking and tripped I didn't feel like smoking though. It helped solidify my decision not to smoke. Drinking on the other hand would always be the reason why I started smoking again. DXM is the only substance that made me want to quit after using it while I was still smoking. I think it is one of the most powerful smoking cessation aids I've ever encountered
    Last edited by mr peabody; 12-06-2018 at 23:24.
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    Woodstock


    I’ve seen ibogaine actually block nicotine use in the first few days after it was administered. Nicotine is a really addictive substance. We’ve had this whole debate in the congress, in the
    media about nicotine. That is a damn addictive substance, and nicotine fits right in the addiction circuit we are talking about in the brain. This is why Ibogaine is intriguing, because it may be affecting the circuit by hitting or tweaking a few different pieces of the chemical circuit in a way that makes it multifunctional, why it is so efficacious against alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, heroin and other opiates.

    -Deborah Mash, Ph.D.

    -----

    I suffered from depression and anxiety and I was outside the workforce for many years because of this. But I feel that entheogens have helped me, and I see myself as completely healthy today. LSD also helped me quit my addiction to cigarettes.

    -ID17

    -----

    This invention is based on the discovery that at very low doses, ibogaine will reduce the desire to smoke. Ibogaine is believed to bind to several receptors in the brain, with nAChR having the greater binding affinity for ibogaine than other receptors in the brain.

    This allows for the treatment of nicotine addiction using much lower doses of ibogaine than are currently used for the treatment of other conditions, such as opioid withdrawal.

    Read more: http://www.patentsencyclopedia.com/a...#ixzz4tHEJCwHQ
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    The Jimi Hendrix Experience She's So Fine


    Ibogaine is the closest thing we have to a cure for addiction at the moment, I think, because it works on different levels, not only alleviating acute WD symptoms but giving the
    psycho-spiritual aspect too... this in most people seems to do the trick.

    The long term reduction in cravings is due to the ibogaine converting to noribogaine in the liver and slowly releasing small amounts into the body. This has been proven in studies.

    Also in studies on rats it's been shown (when given to addicted rats that had previously had a lever to give themselves a morphine dose) to stop them dosing! So it's not just placebo.

    It somehow resets the dopamine receptors too so you don't get the long term depression with normal opiate withdrawals.

    I can say definitely for sure that it works for nicotine... I've smoked 40 cigarettes a day for 18 years, and I didn't even realise I didn't even want a cigarette for the first few days after,
    and when I did have one it tasted like an ashtray. Disgusting!

    -sids

    -----


    I had my last cigarette at the start of my Ibogaine ceremony 12 days ago, and I do not feel any cravings. I eat healthier, and I drink less alcohol. I've also seen an improvement in my self esteem and self confidence. It was a great experience. I am happy I did it and I think everybody should do this at least once in his/her life.

    -Stefan

    -----

    Iboga really helped me to be more grounded and relaxed. It also helped me to quit smoking and alcohol. I tried not to expect anything from Iboga, but in the end I gotta say I expected a lot. Iboga works in a very subtle and unconscious [way], not like any entheogens I tried before. The experience itself was very exhausting for the body and on the end of the second day of the ceremony I was really frustrated because I thought it did not work, but it did. The day after, I already felt more calm and quiet in my mind. I find it much easier now to resist smoking and drinking and I am generally taking better care of myself. I also speak my opinion more clearly and I know my personal borders better.

    But one should not make the mistake to see it as the magic pill. You really have to work hard on yourself as well, in the end it is you who makes the change, but Iboga can really help you in your process. I feel much more grounded and relaxed now, but I know I still have a long way to go.

    -Julia

    -----

    Like everyone, I was skeptical. A friend recommended that I check out Ibogaine treatment. After 10 years of being addicted to alcohol and prescription pain pills, I was cured. And I stopped smoking cigarettes, which I have been doing for almost 30 years.

    -Robert Joe Lorem



    Last edited by mr peabody; 13-06-2018 at 03:48.
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