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Thread: U.S. - House passes bill (SITSA) to escalate drug war / Bill dies in Senate

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    #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Help?!?! View Post
    Why are we talking about kratom?!? It's been about to be scheduled for years now. Let's focus on all the amazing chemicals that weren't in the cross hairs but now definitely definitely ARE!
    Yeah sorry.

    I think I don't know what I'm missing with most of them and have wanted to try them for a long time but the only one I ever have is Flurophenibut.

    I still want to.

    But is their potential for being banned necessarily worse than in the 2000s??

    If you look at his quote (and yeah, he's just some dude so no one knows how much info he has):

    "Look into the Analogue Act which has been in effect since the late 2000's. It has the exact same wording as SITSA, minus increased minimum sentencing."



    It seems he's talking about all of the RCs as well. If it's true that it has the same wording as the one in the early 2000s, do we have more reason to worry about those now than we did than??

    As an aside though, what are some interesting ones that DON'T negatively interact with SSRIs??


    I've heard 4-ACO DMT is interesting...
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    #27
    Bluelighter CosmicG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Help?!?! View Post
    Why are we talking about kratom?!? It's been about to be scheduled for years now. Let's focus on all the amazing chemicals that weren't in the cross hairs but now definitely definitely ARE!
    Fuck

    Kratom is honestly the very least of my concerns here
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    #28
    Bluelighter CosmicG's Avatar
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    It's been getting increasingly difficult to find a domestic source for a lot of my favorite RC's lately due to my main one being raided and the remaining ones becoming less and less reliable. I had wondered if something like this was,not fast approaching, what with the ban of etizolam becoming increasibgly popular and kratom constantly being in the air. Luckily the state that I live in doesn't seem too concerned with these drugs, but if it is banned on a federal level then that won't matter obviously.

    Have they not been trying to pass bills similar to this for quite some time now?

    ^Not educated enough or experienced with ssri drugs to give you a definitive answer but hey it doesn't get much better than 4-ACO-DMT and 4-HO-MET for Tryptamines. All of the lysergamides are amazing as well.
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by CosmicG View Post
    It's been getting increasingly difficult to find a domestic source for a lot of my favorite RC's lately due to my main one being raided and the remaining ones becoming less and less reliable. I had wondered if something like this was,not fast approaching, what with the ban of etizolam becoming increasibgly popular and kratom constantly being in the air. Luckily the state that I live in doesn't seem too concerned with these drugs, but if it is banned on a federal level then that won't matter obviously.

    Have they not been trying to pass bills similar to this for quite some time now?

    ^Not educated enough or experienced with ssri drugs to give you a definitive answer but hey it doesn't get much better than 4-ACO-DMT and 4-HO-MET for Tryptamines. All of the lysergamides are amazing as well.
    I've heard those tryptamines that might be more closely related to psilocybin/psilocin are generally ok on SSRIs and I've used shrooms several times on them and have been fine, and I've also been fine on LSD.

    So would those 2 be your top RC psychs to recommend?

    What are you favorite ones you are interested in trying so I can try them before (of course hoping they WON'T) become illegal?
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    #30
    Bluelighter LucidSDreamr's Avatar
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    Mandatory minimums? Better build a lot of (private) prisons because drug use is higher than ever.

    See you all there!
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    #31
    Fuck that.

    They'll never take me alive.

    Cognitive liberty for all!
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    #32
    Bluelighter LucidSDreamr's Avatar
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    ∆ don't you know we can keep doing drugs in prison? . Now thats what I call rehabilitation.
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    #33
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    Good news! SITSA failed to get through the Senate.

    The Inside Story of the SITSA Win
    Michael Collins
    Drug Policy Alliance
    September 28th, 2018

    This week, the drug policy reform movement averted disaster after a deeply damaging SITSA Act --formally known as the "Stop the Importation and Trafficking of Synthetic Analogues Act of 2017"-- was excluded from a large package of bills aimed at tackling the overdose crisis. The bill would have expanded penalties on synthetic analogue drugs, similar to fentanyl, and given Attorney General Jeff Sessions broad power to schedule certain drugs and therefore set penalties. This road to victory was hard fought over the course of more than a year, and the result came about because of several communities uniting around this important cause.

    In June 2017, the bill was first introduced. The drug policy and criminal justice reform movements were reeling from the appointment of Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, and his elimination of the "Smart on Crime" memo, which meant that Sessions' prosecutors would now aggressively pursue mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses. The threat of a crackdown on marijuana legalization loomed large. Against that backdrop, SITSA was introduced. The scope of the bill -- allowing the Attorney General broad powers to unilaterally decide which drugs should be scheduled -- was unprecedented for any time, let alone a moment when the Trump Administration was so intent on escalating the drug war. We had to fight back.

    The popularity of criminal justice reform was a boon to our cause. In previous Congresses, Republicans and Democrats in both chambers had worked together to advance legislation that reduced sentences for drug offenses, and many recognized that -- despite the overdose crisis -- we cannot incarcerate our way out of this problem. So it was up to those of us in the criminal justice reform community to point out to legislators the contradiction -- how can you be for sentencing reform and support SITSA?

    Media attention on the bill highlighted the flaws in the "lock-em up" approach to synthetic analogue drugs. As NPR aptly noted, "For nearly four years now, an unusual coalition of Republicans and Democrats has worked to reduce mandatory prison terms for many federal drug crimes. But that bipartisan movement may be shallower than it appears. Indeed, Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa and Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who both supported a cut-back on some drug punishments, are preparing a bill that would create tough new penalties for people caught with synthetic opioid drugs." The Washington Post wrote, "Congress is considering a bill that would expand Jeff Sessions' power to escalate the war on drugs."

    Another community that was engaged were supporters of Kratom -- a herbal substance used by people with chronic pain and opioid use problems. Under the bill, Kratom would almost certainly be banned, and tough penalties would apply to anyone who used the substance. From day one, Kratom supporters pressured their members of Congress to oppose the bill.
    Read the full story here.
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    #34
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    Thank God.
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    #35
    $20 says they reword it and we see it again next year or the next
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    #36
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    Florida has tried to ban kratom three times and each time the bill never even made it out of committee. The unbelievable part to me is that an otherwise liberal Democrat from Fort Lauderdale has been the one leading the charge. The garbage and misinformation she spews on the subject is nothing short of breathtaking. She must have gotten the message though, because she didn't even try this last legislative session. If the reactionary yahoos in Tallahassee didn't even bite on the subject of kratom, I'm not too worried about it. On the other hand, the state everyone likes to paint as bluer-than-blue Vermont did ban it. Go figure.
    Struggling with addiction? Join us at Sober Living. We can help.
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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by S.J.P. View Post
    Good news! SITSA failed to get through the Senate.

    The Inside Story of the SITSA Win
    Michael Collins
    Drug Policy Alliance
    September 28th, 2018



    Read the full story here.

    I did hear this and was pleased, but with this being the case, how come there's a good chance now that Ohio may be scheduling Kratom soon??

    I'm glad I don't live there (sorry for those who do...), but is there somehow no connection between the SITSA bill failing and their ability to schedule it in their state?

    Is it that Ohio has its own state laws, whereas SITSA is nation wide??

    And if that is the case, then does SITSA failing to pass in the senate make it any less likely that ANY state will schedule Kratom?

    Like, I'm in New York, so I was hoping this was a sign that it might be harder for them to schedule Kratom here, but is this not the case if they are quite likely to schedule it in Ohio??

    I don't get it. Why didn't the fact that it didn't pass through the senate help the situation in Ohio??
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    #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mycophile View Post
    I don't get it. Why didn't the fact that it didn't pass through the senate help the situation in Ohio??
    States in the United States have the power to schedule compounds independently of the federal government. So if a state legislature wants to schedule Kratom, it has the power to do so. Whether or not SITSA or any other bill changing federal scheduling powers passes has no bearing on this.
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    #39
    Bluelighter LucidSDreamr's Avatar
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    im very surprised that this didn't pass
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    #40
    Bluelighter ro4eva's Avatar
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    Phew...

    This dying breed of narrow-minded drug warriors cannot fade into obscurity soon enough.
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