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Covid-19 Outbreak of new SARS-like coronavirus (Covid-19)

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Mr. Krinkle

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“My body, my choice” only applies to select groups, but if your not a part of those groups your a racist bigoted privileged ableist piece of dog shit that should have no rights, the level of mental illness that certain people display is astounding

It's insane that the parties are reversed on this.....how can you be on the left and say my body my choice to abortions but not to vaccines?

just another absurdity to add to all of this


i'll tell ya what tho, ive always been center-left and when i would vote, it was mostly left, including last November....and now, i'll never vote for another Democrat ever again after all of this.....think im the only one? watch....
 

Xorkoth

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I wish we had ranked voting so I could vote third party. I hate the two party monopoly we have going on.

I mean obviously I COULD vote third party, but it would be a wasted vote. Instead I have to choose the lesser of two evils. And try to figure out which one that is.
 

Las Veghost grower

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It's insane that the parties are reversed on this.....how can you be on the left and say my body my choice to abortions but not to vaccines?

just another absurdity to add to all of this


i'll tell ya what tho, ive always been center-left and when i would vote, it was mostly left, including last November....and now, i'll never vote for another Democrat ever again after all of this.....think im the only one? watch....
I was an anarchist in my teens early 20s then I guess what you’d call center left in my mid to late 20s and gradually becoming more conservative as I see the absolute insanity from the left, I haven’t voted since Obama who I vote for but honestly the Democratic Party is making it real hard to get behind IMO, but I do agree it’s pretty bullshit we get 2 options to choose from , in the grand scheme of things it’s not even a choice more like the illusion of a choice
 
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cduggles

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The mystery of how people have or gain COVID immunity is hopefully beginning to unravel.

The people with hidden immunity against Covid-19

While the latest research suggests that antibodies against Covid-19 could be lost in just three months, a new hope has appeared on the horizon: the enigmatic T cell.

The clues have been mounting for a while. First, scientists discovered patients who had recovered from infection with Covid-19, but mysteriously didn’t have any antibodies against it. Next it emerged that this might be the case for a significant number of people. Then came the finding that many of those who do develop antibodies seem to lose them again after just a few months.
In short, though antibodies have proved invaluable for tracking the spread of the pandemic, they might not have the leading role in immunity that we once thought. If we are going to acquire long-term protection, it looks increasingly like it might have to come from somewhere else.
But while the world has been preoccupied with antibodies, researchers have started to realise that there might be another form of immunity – one which, in some cases, has been lurking undetected in the body for years. An enigmatic type of white blood cell is gaining prominence. And though it hasn’t previously featured heavily in the public consciousness, it may well prove to be crucial in our fight against Covid-19. This could be the T cell’s big moment.
T cells are a kind of immune cell, whose main purpose is to identify and kill invading pathogens or infected cells. It does this using proteins on its surface, which can bind to proteins on the surface of these imposters. Each T cell is highly specific – there are trillions of possible versions of these surface proteins, which can each recognise a different target. Because T cells can hang around in the blood for years after an infection, they also contribute to the immune system’s “long-term memory” and allow it to mount a faster and more effective response when it’s exposed to an old foe.

Several studies have shown that people infected with Covid-19 tend to have T cells that can target the virus, regardless of whether they have experienced symptoms. So far, so normal. But scientists have also recently discovered that some people can test negative for antibodies against Covid-19 and positive for T cells that can identify the virus. This has led to suspicions that some level of immunity against the disease might be twice as common as was previously thought.

Most bizarrely of all, when researchers tested blood samples taken years before the pandemic started, they found T cells which were specifically tailored to detect proteins on the surface of Covid-19. This suggests that some people already had a pre-existing degree of resistance against the virus before it ever infected a human. And it appears to be surprisingly prevalent: 40-60% of unexposed individuals had these cells.
It looks increasingly like T cells might be a secret source of immunity to Covid-19.
The central role of T cells could also help to explain some of the quirks that have so far eluded understanding – from the dramatic escalation in risk that people face from the virus as they get older, to the mysterious discovery that it can destroy the spleen.

Deciphering the importance of T cells isn’t just a matter of academic curiosity. If scientists know which aspects of the immune system are the most important, they can direct their efforts to make vaccines and treatments that work.

How immunity unfolds

Most people probably haven’t thought about T cells, or T lymphocytes as they are also known, since school, but to see just how crucial they are for immunity, we can look to late-stage Aids. The persistent fevers. The sores. The fatigue. The weight loss. The rare cancers. The normally harmless microbes, such as the fungus Candida albicans – usually found on the skin – which start to take over the body.

Over the course of months or years, HIV enacts a kind of T cell genocide, in which it hunts them down, gets inside them and systematically makes them commit suicide. “It wipes out a large fraction of them,” says Adrian Hayday, an immunology professor at King’s College London and group leader at the Francis Crick Institute. “And so that really emphasises how incredibly important these cells are – and that antibodies alone are not going to get you through.”

During a normal immune response – to, let’s say, a flu virus – the first line of defence is the innate immune system, which involves white blood cells and chemical signals that raise the alarm. This initiates the production of antibodies, which kick in a few weeks later.

“And in parallel with that, starting out about four or five days after infection, you begin to see T cells getting activated, and indications they are specifically recognising cells infected with the virus,” says Hayday. These unlucky cells are then dispatched quickly and brutally – either directly by the T cells themselves, or by other parts of the immune system they recruit to do the unpleasant task for them – before the virus has a chance to turn them into factories that churn out more copies of itself.

The good and bad news

So, what do we know about T cells and Covid-19?

“Looking at Covid-19 patients – but also I’m happy to say, looking at individuals who have been infected but did not need hospitalisation – it’s absolutely clear that there are T cell responses,” says Hayday. “And almost certainly this is very good news for those who are interested in vaccines, because clearly we’re capable of making antibodies and making T cells that see the virus. That’s all good.”

In fact, one vaccine – developed by the University of Oxford – has already been shown to trigger the production of these cells, in addition to antibodies. It’s still too early to know how protective the response will be, but one member of the research group told BBC News that the results were “extremely promising”. (Read more about the Oxford University vaccine and what it's like to be part of the trial).

There is a catch, however. In many patients who are hospitalised with more serious Covid-19, the T cell response hasn’t quite gone to plan.

“Vast numbers of T cells are being affected,” says Hayday. “And what is happening to them is a bit like a wedding party or a stag night gone wrong – I mean massive amounts of activity and proliferation, but the cells are also just disappearing from the blood.”

One theory is that these T cells are just being redirected to where they’re needed most, such as the lungs. But his team suspects that a lot of them are dying instead.

“Autopsies of Covid-19 patients are beginning to reveal what we call necrosis, which is a sort of rotting,” he says. This is particularly evident in the areas of the spleen and lymph glands where T cells normally live.

Disconcertingly, spleen necrosis is a hallmark of T cell disease, in which the immune cells themselves are attacked. “If you look in post-mortems of Aids patients, you see these same problems,” says Hayday. “But HIV is a virus that directly infects T cells, it knocks on the door and it gets in.” In contrast, there is currently no evidence that the Covid-19 virus is able to do this.

“There are potentially many explanations for this, but to my knowledge, nobody has one yet,” says Hayday. “We have no idea what is happening. There’s every evidence that the T cells can protect you, probably for many years. But when people get ill, the rug seems to be being pulled from under them in their attempts to set up that protective defence mechanism.”
Dwindling T cells might also be to blame for why the elderly are much more severely affected by Covid-19.
Hayday points to an experiment conducted in 2011, which involved exposing mice to a version of the virus that causes Sars. Previous research had shown that the virus – which is also a coronavirus and a close relative of Covid-19 – triggered the production of T cells, which were responsible for clearing theinfection.

The follow-up study produced similar results, but the twist was that this time the mice were allowed to grow old. As they did so, their T cell responses became significantly weaker.

However, in the same experiment, the scientists also exposed mice to a flu virus. And in contrast to those infected with Covid-19, these mice managed to hold onto their T cells that acted against influenza well into their twilight years.

“It’s an attractive observation, in the sense that it could explain why older individuals are more susceptible to Covid-19,” says Hayday. “When you reach your 30s, you begin to really shrink your thymus [a gland located behind your sternum and between your lungs, which plays an important role in the development of immune cells] and your daily production of T cells is massively diminished.”

What does this mean for long-term immunity?

“With the original Sars virus [which emerged in 2002], people went back to patients and definitely found evidence for T cells some years after they these individuals were infected,” says Hayday. “This is again consistent with the idea that these individuals carried protective T cells, long after they had recovered.”

The fact that coronaviruses can lead to lasting T cells is what recently inspired scientists to check old blood samples taken from people between 2015 and 2018, to see if they would contain any that can recognise Covid-19. The fact that this was indeed the case has led to suggestions that their immune systems learnt to recognise it after being encountering cold viruses with the similar surface proteins in the past.

This raises the tantalising possibility that the reason some people experience more severe infections is that they haven’t got these hoards of T cells which can already recognise the virus. “I think it’s fair to say that the jury is still out,” says Hayday.

Unfortunately, no one has ever verified if people make T cells against any of the coronaviruses that give rise to the common cold. “To get funding to study this would have required a pretty Herculean effort,” says Hayday. Research into the common cold fell out of fashion in the 1980s, after the field stagnated and scientists began to move to other projects, such as studying HIV. Making progress since then has proved tricky, because the illness can be caused by any one of hundreds of viral strains – and many of them have the ability to evolve rapidly.


Will this lead to a vaccine?

If old exposures to cold viruses really are leading to milder cases of Covid-19, however, this bodes well for the development of a vaccine – since it’s proof that lingering T cells can provide significant protection, even years after they were made.

But even if this isn’t what’s happening, the involvement of T cells could still be beneficial – and the more we understand what’s going on, the better.

Hayday explains that the way vaccines are designed generally depends on the kind of immune response scientists are hoping to elicit. Some might trigger the production of antibodies – free-floating proteins which can bind to invading pathogens, and either neutralise them or tag them for another part of the immune system to deal with. Others might aim to get T cells involved, or perhaps provoke a response from other parts of the immune system.

“There really is an enormous spectrum of vaccine design,” says Hayday. He’s particularly encouraged by the fact that the virus is evidently highly visible to the immune system, even in those who are severely affected. “So if we can stop whatever it’s doing to the T cells of the patients we've had the privilege to work with, then we will be a lot further along in controlling the disease.”

It seems likely that we are going to be hearing a lot more about T cells in the future.
 
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cduggles

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This is a pretty graphic article, but it’s an interesting perspective to hear from someone dealing with the bodies of people who died from COVID. The fact that he’s seeing younger people is telling.
The septic saliva and gangrenous tissue is just nasty though.

Texas Embalmer Shares Nightmare COVID Experiences: ‘Unlike Anything I’ve Seen Before’​

Patrick Huey contacted HuffPost after reading a story about a Florida-based ICU doctor who broke down on CNN while being interviewed about patients dying of COVID-19. The Texas-based funeral professional, who has worked as an embalmer for the past 30 years and won the South Central Texas Funeral Directors Association’s first-ever Embalmer of the Year award in 2019, offered to share his own harrowing COVID-related experiences, as well as the toll working in the funeral industry during the pandemic is taking on him and his colleagues.
His account below has been lightly edited for clarity.

When COVID first started, we really didn’t know a whole lot about how it was spread ― or, really, much else. There just wasn’t a lot of information out there. A lot of the states were recommending or even mandating not embalming bodies because so much was unknown at the time regarding how contagious COVID was, how it was spread, the fatality rate, and what chemicals effectively killed it.
As time went by, we found that the bodies could be embalmed. That’s our preference if you have to store people for any length of time. Our opinion is that it’s much, much safer if the body has been embalmed and bathed, and then we can store them without having to utilize refrigeration.
It wasn’t until about late November or early December of last year when the surge really hit us in Texas, and then it was just awful. Just awful. We were pulling 22- and 36-hour shifts, and we were short-handed to begin with. We went like that until about the middle of March. At that point about 65%, or maybe a little less, of the bodies we were receiving had COVID.
The death rate in general over the past few years has been unprecedented. The baby boomer generation has begun to die, and we are seeing more bodies than ever before. Add COVID to that and we’re reaching a breaking point.
We get bodies out of ICU regularly, but not in the condition that these COVID bodies are in.
We’ve just had to buckle down and do the best that we can. The internet has been a blessing because it allows all of us embalmers to communicate and find out what issues everyone is having because so much of this has been unlike anything we’ve seen before. We get bodies out of ICU regularly, but not in the condition that these COVID bodies are in. They’re tremendously swollen. If they’ve been on a ventilator, that often completely runs down their immune system. It also opens them up to a lot of sepsis and secondary infections that tend to hang around hospitals, like penicillin-resistant staph infections.
These folks were so swollen they were completely unrecognizable. We were also getting sent a lot of people who had died from COVID in nursing homes back at that time, and many of them had not been dead very long at all. Generally when we embalm, we utilize a major artery to inject the embalming fluid and we use its adjoining vein for drainage. The blood tends to settle out because it’s no longer flowing and it’ll gravitate to the dependent part of the body. The longer a body sits, the more blood clots that they develop. I was having people that had only been dead for a few hours and there were major clotting issues. The clots were the size of pancakes ― you never, never see those with someone who didn’t die of COVID.
I’ve been doing this for 30 years and pretty much everywhere I’ve worked has been medium to high volume. I’m not one of those embalmers that works at a place that just does 50 or 60 bodies a year. So I’ve done this long enough and I’ve seen enough that I would know when something different pops up. COVID is unlike anything I’ve seen before.
Many of the people who were in the ICU were on ventilators, and they put adhesive patches on their cheeks. They can easily become septic and they drip that septic saliva on the sides of their faces and the skin in that area gets infected. We were literally receiving bodies with huge lesions on their cheeks or [patches that had gone] gangrene. The sad part is the families of these people, at that point, hadn’t been allowed to see their loved ones during the several weeks that they were in the ICU. So the body comes out in an almost unrecognizable condition, and then you have to explain to their family that their loved one doesn’t look anything like what they should.
Despite the fact that I specialize in postmortem reconstruction ― accidents, trauma, stuff like that ― when the bodies are that swollen, there is very little I can do to eliminate that. And for a lot of these families, it’s just a tremendous shock. I’ve had husbands and wives die within days of each other. I’ve seen entire families wiped out. It’s horrible.
With this current surge from [the delta variant], I notice we’re not getting bodies out of the nursing homes like we were the last time, most likely due to the fact that most of these old nursing home patients have been vaccinated. Right now the bodies I’m seeing are ranging from the late 20s to the elderly. We’ve had quite a few bodies in their mid-to-late 30s, 40s, 50s. I’ve also noticed that with delta, for the most part, these people were not spending nearly as much time in the ICU before they die. Sadly, that’s been to our benefit because they’re not in as bad of a condition as they were with the last surge.
We’re just doing what we can, but we’re constantly worried about our own safety while working. At my facility, we’re wearing N95 masks because the filtration is so much better and it makes it a good positive seal on your face. I’ve got a mask with a respirator that uses the P100 multivapor cartridges. Aside from that, we’re wearing our standard personal protective equipment and taking extra precautions ― keep our faces covered and doing whatever we can to keep our risks as low as we possibly can. As far as handling the body goes, if you roll the body, if you put pressure on the chest, there’s the chance of expelling air from the lungs.
After we get done embalming a body, we pack the nasal passages and everything else and once it’s bathed well and preserved well, to me, it’s as safe as it can possibly be and should not pose a risk to the families or anyone else who comes in contact with it. I really wish we were embalming them all, but we just don’t have the manpower right now. As far as licensed embalmers, there’s a definitely a big shortage, especially down here in Texas.
Seeing so many of these people who have passed away who shouldn’t have died in the first place and the husbands and wives passing within days of each other ― on top of just the mass volume ― is a lot to deal with. Although we try to distance ourselves professionally as much as possible while doing our jobs, it wears on us. There are a lot of us that definitely have some PTSD ― or just traumatic stress. It’s really, really hard.
My wife and I don’t get to see much of each other. I’ve got two kids who just started college, and they don’t get to see nearly as much of me as they would like to. And it’s very difficult. Right now shifts start at 8 a.m. and we are currently working 19 to 20 hours the first day of our two-day shifts. Then we’re back up after sleeping a few hours, and we don’t sleep that second night of work. Then I go home and either work other places in my town ― I live in East Texas and I drive to central Texas for work and, even when I’m home, I often help out at the local funeral home here and other places are calling for help ― or, if I am lucky, I will sleep 30 hours straight. My downfall or failing has been the inability to tell people “no” when they call for help.
I’d say 85% of the people who are coming in right now passed from COVID. A lot of them are coming from the ICU. It’s not uncommon to get bodies from there, but what is uncommon is to get seven or eight or 10 bodies a day.
It’s so bad that we have had to get one of those large government FEMA refrigerated trailers. We’ve never had that before. Our facility has the ability to hold somewhere around 90 or 100 bodies in the walk-in refrigerator in our building, and another smaller one in the garage will hold another 18 or so bodies. And we’re full! If it comes down to it and we completely run out of refrigeration space, we will wind up having to embalm everybody that comes in that we can’t put into refrigeration. Basically, if we can’t get a body into refrigeration or buried within 24 hours, then we have to embalm, and there are only so many people who are qualified to do that.
Although we try to distance ourselves professionally as much as possible while doing our jobs, it wears on us. There are a lot of us that definitely have some PTSD ― or just traumatic stress. It’s really, really hard.
I don’t know how much longer I can keep working this way. I’ll never throw my hands up and just say “screw this!” If the good Lord calls me home and I drop dead at the embalming table, then I guess that’ll make for a day off.
We are losing staff in places. A lot of new folks are graduating from mortuary school. They’re starting to work and are immediately slammed with COVID cases and they can’t handle it and and they wind up getting out. We’ve had a lot of funeral professionals who have gotten COVID, and there have been several I know of who have died from it.
The smaller, independent funeral homes, when they’re dealing with COVID, the next thing you know, their entire staff has it. And they pretty much have to take the phone off the hook, lock doors and shut down because they don’t have anybody to run the place. So, we’ve got a lot of embalmers who are traveling around from place to place, just trying to help out everybody who has shortages ― just to keep the doors open and keep serving the public.
I’m on Facebook and whatever occasionally, but I don’t post a lot about my job and about what I do, because it’s just my job and I just do it. [The embalmers] are just doing the best that we can, and I wish that people would just do the best that they can to stay safe. I want everyone to take this seriously and to remember that the repercussions of their actions run downhill, and we funeral professionals are down near the bottom of that hill.
Lastly, I’ll just say I wish this would quit being such a political thing. People want to blame one party or the other, and I don’t know what the answer is. I do know that the studies have shown the vaccination works and I wish more people would get it. And sometimes we have to have our freedoms infringed upon just a little bit for the betterment of the entire population. We’re just trying to do our part ― and we wish everyone else would do the same.
 

Asclepius

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...can we just take a minute to appreciate this.

"The Texas-based funeral professional, who has worked as an embalmer for the past 30 years and won the South Central Texas Funeral Directors Association’s first-ever Embalmer of the Year award in 2019"
😑

wait....

:cheer:
 

6am-64-14m

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I quit watching news and prefer cartoons... more entertaining, less lies "fake truth" l and more common seance, imo.
All news ifs fake imo unless one knows something or experienced the subject matter in person.
Just posting here i guess cause it really may not make any rael differences on way or the other.

Fight the powerless! ha

We can win.... but....
 

6am-64-14m

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nope got my own fantasy land and it is a whole lot less bs and sress. ;)

maybe i misunersood. wanna shoot again?
one
 

Yourbaker

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The mystery of how people have or gain COVID immunity is hopefully beginning to unravel.

The people with hidden immunity against Covid-19


Re-reading this article from just over a year ago brought back a lot of the initial information that has been sidelined due to a lack of current populararity.

The number of individuals who were already equipped with the right T-cell to fight covid being between 40 and 60% of the population seems about right. Ive now seen covid spread in a kitchen (close working staff where masks provide little beyond discomfort) some people are just resilient or already immune.

I realize a lot of you are writting about your fears and panics and like to find a scape goat to blame but you have a huge choice of vaccines now to take.

Can we please stop trying to blame people who choose not to vaccinate with your fears. If they're naturally immune they arent a worry to you and if they arent covid can kill them for you. No need to attack, just breath and think past the last news real you swallowed.
 
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